Richard Baldwin, Paul Collier, Anthony Venables, 29 March 2017

Regardless of what one may think of the decision, the British people have voted to leave the EU – a result that throws up historic challenges as well as historic opportunities. This column introduces CEPR's latest Policy Insight, which suggests that Brexit should be viewed as an important opportunity for fresh thinking.

Thomas Piketty, Emmanuel Saez, Gabriel Zucman, 29 March 2017

The rise of economic inequality is one of today’s most hotly debated issues. But a disconnect between the different data sets used to measure and understand inequality makes it hard to address important economic and policy questions. In this column, the authors highlight the findings from their attempt to create inequality statistics for the US that overcome the limitations of existing data by creating distributional national accounts.

Alexis Grigorieff, Chris Roth, Diego Ubfal, 29 March 2017

There has been a surge of anti-immigrant sentiment in the US and many European countries. This column uses survey results to show that accurate information about numbers of immigrants changes opinions on whether there are too many immigrants, but not on policy towards them. More detailed information on the characteristics of immigrants, however, can increase support for pro-immigrant policies, particularly among those who start off with the most negative views on immigration.

Aida Caldera, Alain de Serres, Filippo Gori, Oliver Röhn, 28 March 2017

Severe recessions have been frequent among OECD countries over the past four decades. This column explores the implications of various broad types of policy to minimise the risk and frequency of such episodes for the trade-off for the growth-fragility nexus. Product and labour market policies improve growth but are essentially neutral with regards to economic risks, while better quality institutions increase both growth and economic stability. Macroprudential and financial market policies, on the other hand, entail a trade-off between growth and risk.

Stephen Cecchetti, Kim Schoenholtz, 28 March 2017

US monetary policy has been the target of substantial criticism over the years. This column outlines one key area where the Federal Reserve has done remarkably well – managing price stability.  Its ability to control inflation is a key reason that, for the sake of the US and global economies, the Fed’s independence should be preserved.

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