Giancarlo Corsetti, Lars Feld, Ralph Koijen, Lucrezia Reichlin, Ricardo Reis, Hélène Rey, Beatrice Weder di Mauro, 27 May 2016

Europe has failed to design institutions robust enough to weather difficult times, as the sovereign debt and refugee crises prove. This column introduces CEPR’s new Monitoring the Eurozone report, Reinforcing the Eurozone and Protecting an Open Society, which argues that coordinated actions are urgently needed. The institutional changes proposed by the authors are politically feasible and would help restore prosperity to the Eurozone.

Peter Bofinger, 08 April 2016

Diagnosing the EZ Crisis is a critical first step towards developing a consensus on how the monetary union should be fixed. This column contrasts views that place the blame mostly on markets with those that place the onus on governments. The fixes necessary for the survival of the euro are – correspondingly – more ‘market discipline’ or ‘political discipline’ exerted at the European level. Neither is very attractive, but it should be clear that ‘market discipline’ is not a mechanism run by atomistic players. Global wealth is highly concentrated, so market discipline means, de facto, a regime of plutocracy.

Rebooting Consensus Authors, 20 November 2015

The Eurozone needs fixing, but it is impossible to agree upon the steps to be taken without agreement on what went wrong. This column introduces a new CEPR Policy Insight that presents a consensus-narrative of the causes of the EZ Crisis. It was authored by a dozen leading economists from across the spectrum. The consensus narrative is supported by a long and growing list of economists. 

Richard Baldwin, Thorsten Beck, Agnès Bénassy-Quéré, Olivier Blanchard, Giancarlo Corsetti, Paul De Grauwe, Wouter den Haan, Francesco Giavazzi, Daniel Gros, Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan, Stefano Micossi, Elias Papaioannou, Paolo Pesenti, Christopher Pissarides , Guido Tabellini, Beatrice Weder di Mauro, 19 November 2015

The Eurozone Crisis, which broke out in May 2010, is a long way from finished. Worse yet, many of the fragilities and imbalances that primed the monetary union for the Crisis are still present. EZ decision-makers will never agree upon the changes needed to prevent future crises unless they agree upon the basic facts that explain how the EZ Crisis got so bad and lasted so long. CEPR Policy Insight 85 presents a consensus narrative of the causes.

Giancarlo Corsetti, Lars Feld, Philip Lane, Lucrezia Reichlin, Hélène Rey, Dimitri Vayanos, Beatrice Weder di Mauro, 15 April 2015

The Eurozone’s problems of poor growth and the threat of financial instability are rooted in its very foundation. The authors of the inaugural Monitoring the Eurozone report, launched today, consider three means by which the Eurozone can protect itself from structural failure. Their recommendations, which do not require Treaty changes, are crucial in offsetting the major risks a repetition of the recent Crisis would present.

Katharina Pistor, 26 February 2014

Who wields supreme power over the ECB? This column analyses the recent ruling by the German Constitutional Court that the ECB cannot act as lender of last resort. Although seemingly couched by the referral of this decision to the European Court of Justice, this is a bid for power and the return to the pre-crisis paradigm of ‘ultra posse nemo obligatur’.

László Andor, 16 December 2013

Today's Eurozone operates in a way that is momentarily advantageous for capital-owners in the surplus countries and creditors at large, but damaging for workers and entrepreneurs, debtors of all types and most users of public services. This column argues that this is unsustainable. The Eurozone must be reformed to avoid the risk that the EU itself could be destroyed by political conflict among the winners and losers. 2014 is a window of opportunity for seriously re-considering the Eurozone's functioning and for moving away from the 'Maastricht orthodoxy'. To recover from stagnation and regain citizens’ trust, Europe needs a genuine paradigm shift on the Eurozone.

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