Development

Ralph De Haas, Steven Poelhekke, 22 September 2016

The extraordinary expansion in global mining activity over the last two decades, and its increasing concentration in emerging markets, has reignited the debate over the impact of mining on local economic activity. This column analyses how the presence of nearby mines influences firms in eight countries with large manufacturing and mining sectors. Mines are found to out-compete local manufacturing firms for inputs, labour, and infrastructure. However, mining activity is found to improve the business environment on a wider geographic scale.

Miguel Niño-Zarazúa, Laurence Roope, Finn Tarp, 20 September 2016

Since the turn of the century, income inequality has risen to be among the most prominent policy issues of our time. This column looks at inequality trends in recent decades. While relative global inequality has fallen, insufficient economic convergence, together with substantial growth in per capita incomes, has resulted in increased absolute inequality since the mid-1970s. The inclusivity aspect of growth is now more imperative than ever.

Yin-Wong Cheung, Menzie Chinn, Xin Nong, 15 September 2016

As long as countries strive to reallocate aggregate demand in their own favour, disputes will arise regarding the degree to which currency values are 'fair'. This column argues that the Penn effect – the observation that the price level is higher in countries with higher per capita income – may not be a reliable method to discern the fair value of a currency. Different specifications and different datasets lead to different estimates of the degree of misalignment, for example for the Chinese renminbi.

Sergey Nigai, 04 September 2016

Trade economists routinely evaluate changes in consumer welfare due to trade based on the assumption of a representative consumer. This column argues that this assumption often disguises much of the heterogeneity in gains across the income distribution, which leads to an overestimation of the gains for the poor and underestimation for the rich, especially for developing countries. This could help explain the lack of public consensus on the benefits of recent free trade agreements.

John Gibson, 01 September 2016

Different survey methodologies are typically employed to produce estimates of global hunger. This column considers some of the methodological issues that arise. Short reference periods for each household lead to overstated variances and the confounding of chronic and transient welfare components. The column goes on to present a new approach to measuring chronic hunger which tackles this sampling problem by employing an intra-year panel. 

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