Financial markets

Ester Faia, Monica Paiella, 19 September 2017

Over the past decade, there has been substantial growth in peer-to-peer lending through digital platforms, which come with unique benefits and risks compared with traditional funding and investment instruments. This column presents an empirical analysis of the two largest platforms in the US. The results show that various hard and soft information signals have emerged to address inherent information asymmetries. The growth of the sector was further helped by fragility of the banking sector in the wake of Global Crisis.

Tobias Adrian, Michael J. Fleming, Or Shachar, 14 September 2017

The potential adverse effects of regulation on market liquidity in the post-crisis period continue to receive significant attention. This column shows that dealer balance sheets have continued to stagnate and that various measures point to less abundant funding liquidity. Nonetheless, there is little evidence of a wide-spread deterioration in market liquidity. Liquidity remained resilient even during stress events like the 2013 ‘temper tantrum’.

Max Bruche, Frédéric Malherbe, Ralf R Meisenzahl, 11 September 2017

Syndicated loan issuance has grown dramatically over the last 25 years. Over the period, the syndicated loan business model has evolved, affecting the nature of the associated risks that arranging banks are exposed to. This column introduces the concept of ‘pipeline’ risk –the risk associated with marketing the loans during the syndication process. Pipeline risk forces arranging banks to hold much larger shares of very risky syndicated term loans, which results in reduced lending by the arran­­ging bank not only in the syndicated term loan market, but in others as well.

George Dotsis, 10 September 2017

Option trading has grown phenomenally in the last 40 years, but option markets have existed since the early 17th century. This column reviews an option trading manual written by a London trader in 1906. It shows that traders in the 19th century developed sophisticated techniques for determining the prices of short-term calls and puts. They also priced at-the-money-forward straddles the same way they are priced today.

Markus Ibert, Ron Kaniel, Stijn Van Nieuwerburgh, Roine Vestman, 08 September 2017

Empirical analysis of mutual funds has focused on the relationship between funds and fund investors, and little is known about the nature of compensation contracts between firms and managers. This column uses Swedish data to provide novel insights on the relationship between mutual fund firms and manager compensation. In contrast to how investors compensate the fund company, a concave relationship is observed between pay and revenue. The sensitivity of pay to performance is surprisingly weak, with firm-level characteristics playing an important role in dynamic compensation.

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