Financial markets

Toby Nangle, Matt Tickle, 20 April 2017

While defined benefit pension schemes are typically viewed as users rather than sources of sponsor-firm funds, the considerations taken into account when firms choose to scale contributions are such that they become indistinguishable from other firm financing decisions. This column analyses how pension scheme funding deficits arise and argues that whilst deficits do not exist by design, firms’ decision to fund or underfund a defined benefit scheme might usefully be examined as one of many competing sources of long-term finance.

The Editors, 08 April 2017

Central banks are now moving towards exiting from quantitative easing and other unconventional monetary policies. This column highlights a 2013 CEPR/ICMB report that examined the policy challenges surrounding this difficult and unprecedented task. It explores ways policymakers could handle exit and its long-run implications. This is part of the CEPR Flashbacks series that highlights the relevance of past CEPR reports to today’s challenges.

Our CEPR Flashbacks highlight past CEPR reports relevant to today’s challenges. This column highlights a report first published in 2013, which examined how the exit from unconventional monetary policies could be handled by policymakers, what the post-exit world will look like, and the long-run implications for central banks. 

Peter Chen, Loukas Karabarbounis, Brent Neiman, 05 April 2017

Corporate saving has increased relative to GDP and corporate investment across the world over the past three decades, reflecting how the global decline in the labour has led to increased corporate profits. This column characterises these trends using national income accounts and firm-level data, and relates them to firm characteristics and the accumulation of financial assets. In response to declines in the components of the cost of capital, a model with capital market imperfections generates an increase in corporate saving similar to that found in the data.

The Editors, 30 March 2017

This column introduces a new series – CEPR Flashbacks – which highlights past CEPR reports that are relevant to today’s challenges. In many cases, the analysis is highly pertinent to today’s policy questions, while in others the reports provide useful context on how leading thinkers approached similar problems in the past. The first CEPR Flashback highlights a 1995 report, “Flexible Integration”, which suggested a solution to the problem that EU leaders are tackling in their current reflection on the Future of Europe.

Roberto De Santis, 16 March 2017

French sovereign spreads have risen in recent months, coinciding with debate over the euro ahead of the country’s presidential elections in May. Italian sovereign spreads have been rising since the beginning of 2016. This column argues that investors are not pricing a break-up of France from the Eurozone. Most likely, they are pricing the possibility that the newly elected French government will not have enough supremacy to undertake important economic reforms. Market perception of redenomination risk in Italy, on the other hand, is rising slowly. 

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