Financial regulation and banking

Thomas Philippon, Aude Salord, 22 March 2017

Failed financial firms should not be bailed out by the taxpayers. Europe, unfortunately, has a weak track record of following this principle of good governance and sound economic policy. The banking union, with its new approach to supervision and resolution, is meant to improve this matter. This column introduces a new Geneva Special Report on the World Economy which reviews the resolution side of the banking union. 

Luca Benati, Robert Lucas, Juan Pablo Nicolini, Warren E. Weber, 11 March 2017

Most economists and central bankers no longer consider money supply measures to be useful for conducting monetary policy. One reason is the alleged instability of the relationship between monetary aggregates. This column uses data from 32 countries and spanning up to 100 years to argue that the long-run demand for money is alive and well. Results show a remarkable stability in long run money demand, both within and across countries. Nonetheless, short-run departures can be large and persistent, and further research is needed.

Claudia Buch, Lena Tonzer, Benjamin Weigert, 06 March 2017

In response to the Global Crisis, governments have implemented restructuring and resolution regimes backed by funds financed by bank levies. Bank levies aim to internalise system risk externalities and to provide funding for bank recovery and resolution. This column explores bank levy design by considering the German and European cases. The discussion points to the importance of structured policy evaluations to determine the effects of levies.

Mary Amiti, David Weinstein, 12 February 2017

We are living in a world in which banks are large relative to the economies they serve. This column uses comprehensive data on Japanese banks from 1990 to 2010 to examine how the fates of individual banks matter for aggregate performance. Much of the fluctuation in Japanese aggregate investment appears to be driven by the idiosyncratic successes and failures of a limited number of institutions, and there is good reason to believe that the situation is similar in many developed countries.

Biswajit Banerjee, Fabrizio Coricelli, 08 February 2017

Financial markets and the banking sectors in several European countries are still struggling to recover from the Global crisis, with many instances of unresolved problems involving bad loans and fragility of banks. This column introduces a new CEPR eBook, drawing on research presented at the first conference of the European Central Banking Network, which examines the relationship between credit booms and busts and the potential misallocation of resources. Improving the functioning of credit markets and their ability to improve the allocation of resources is crucial to lift Europe out of the phase of low growth that has followed the Global Crisis.

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