Global economy

Lutz Kilian, Xiaoqing Zhou, 09 November 2017

Global commodity prices surged across the board after 2003, with some observers claiming that this reflected a permanent increase in global real economic activity. This column argues that this was a persistent but transitory phenomena tied to rising commodity demand from Asia. It presents evidence of a global economic slowdown since 2011, with low real commodity prices likely to persist.

Stephen Cecchetti, Kim Schoenholtz, 03 November 2017

Black Monday has been referred to as the first contemporary global financial crisis. This column reviews key aspects of the 1987 crash and discusses the subsequent steps taken to improve the resilience of the financial system. It also highlights a key lingering vulnerability – the lack of a mechanism for managing the insolvency of critical payment, clearing, and settlement institutions.

Marlene Amstad, Eli Remolona, Jimmy Shek, 28 October 2017

Global investors are assumed to differentiate between economies using economic fundamentals. This column uses returns on sovereign CDS contracts for 18 emerging markets and ten advanced countries to argue that fundamentals do not drive these decisions. Instead, most of the variation across sovereigns reflects whether or not the country is designated as an 'emerging market'. Investment strategies tend simply to replicate benchmark portfolios.

Nadav Ben Zeev, Evi Pappa, 06 September 2017

Kim Jong Un’s dictatorship has grabbed the attention of the whole world with its nuclear brinkmanship – and global markets have responded with a flight to safe-haven assets. This column reports research showing that such an escalation in international tensions can also have real effects for the US economy in the short to medium run. According to the authors’ analysis of the macroeconomic effects of anticipated increases in defence spending, North Korea’s insistent and rapid test-firing of missiles could boost the US economy.

Yusuf Soner Baskaya, Julian di Giovanni, Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan, Mehmet Fatih Ulu, 01 September 2017

Most models assume capital flows are endogenous to the business cycle, and that inflows increase during an economy’s ‘boom’ periods. This column shows that the international no-arbitrage condition in fact does not hold, and that capital flows are pushed into an economy due to high global risk appetite. Controlling for domestic monetary policy responses to capital flows and changes in the exchange rate, exogenous capital inflows lower real borrowing costs and fuel credit expansion.

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