Health economics

[field_auth], 06 August 2016

Food consumption has increased worldwide, concurrent with rising obesity rates.  This column draws on five decades of data from 209 countries to identify trends in overall caloric intake as well as the types of foods that provide the calories. The data reveal differences between socioeconomic groups and regions that are likely to have important implications for population health. Preliminary analysis of the economic correlates suggests that GDP per capita, labour force participation and healthcare measures explain much of the rise in caloric intake.

[field_auth], 28 July 2016

Progress in adopting smoking bans across the US has been slow, despite a majority of Americans supporting a ban in public places. This column uses aggregate and establishment-level data from Texas to examine the economic effects of smoking bans on bars and restaurants. The results suggest that bars and restaurants are not adversely affected by the adoption of a ban. 

[field_auth], 24 July 2016

‘Defensive medicine’ refers to doctors performing excessive tests and procedures because of concerns about potential malpractice liability. Advocates for reform of the liability system typically argue that this raises healthcare costs with few expected benefits for patients. This column explores how tort reform laws designed to curb defensive medicine affect innovation in medical devices. US states that introduce such laws see a reduction in medical device patenting, suggesting that high liabilities actually encourage innovation.

[field_auth], 15 July 2016

The health effects of pollution in terms of hospitalisations, mortality and morbidity are well researched, but not so much is known about the less severe effects of pollution on workers’ health. This column uses evidence from China to analyse the impact of pollution on productivity, finding that high levels of pollution reduce the productivity even of indoor workers. Reducing pollution is not just welfare-improving for society, it is also of financial benefit to the economy.

[field_auth], 11 July 2016

The rise in obesity has largely been attributed to an increase in calorie consumption. This column investigates this claim by examining the evolving consumption and lifestyles of English households between 1980 and 2013. While there has been an increase in calories from restaurants, fast food, soft drinks, and confectionery, there has been an overall decrease in total calories purchased. This decline in calories can be partially rationalised with weight gain by the decline in the strenuousness of work and daily life, and increasingly sedentary lifestyles. 

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