Migration

Giancarlo Corsetti, Lars P Feld, Ralph S.J. Koijen, Lucrezia Reichlin, Ricardo Reis, Hélène Rey, Beatrice Weder di Mauro, 27 May 2016

The large wave of refugees arriving from the Middle East and Northern Africa is one of the major challenges facing the EU today. In this column, the authors of the 2nd Monitoring the Eurozone report outline their proposal for one measure to help deal with the refugee crisis – EU refugee bonds. EU-wide bonds are an appropriate way to finance the response to the crisis due to the immediate costs for some countries and the future benefits for others of integrating refugees.

Timothy J Hatton, 23 May 2016

The Syrian exodus has created a crisis that has thrown the existing European asylum system into chaos and has led to an increasingly polarised debate over solutions. This column argues that in the long term, we need to shift away from the current system of ‘spontaneous’ asylum migration towards a comprehensive resettlement programme. However, a radical shift towards resettlement is unlikely while the Syrian crisis continues at its current intensity.

Allison Shertzer, Randall Walsh, 19 May 2016

US cities became increasingly segregated by race over the 20th century. General consensus holds that most of this segregation was concentrated in the post-war period. This column uses neighbourhood-level data to find that racial segregation in cities began earlier; indeed, much of it had taken place by 1930. The column also examines the residential response of whites to black arrivals, suggesting that this contributed to segregation in addition to discrimination and institutional factors.

Jonathan Portes, 16 May 2016

Migration is the most important issue for many likely voters in the upcoming UK referendum on EU membership, despite the fact that the economic impacts on the UK of recent EU migration appear to have been relatively benign. This column looks at these impacts, the implications of the UK’s “renegotiation” of its relationship with the EU, and post-Brexit policy options. A vote to Remain will unequivocally be a vote for the status quo in this area. A vote to Leave, however, will take us into new territory for UK immigration policy, with potentially significant consequences.

Guglielmo Barone, Alessio D'Ignazio, Guido de Blasio, Paolo Naticchioni, 19 April 2016

The recent refugee crisis in Europe has highlighted that increased immigration leads to political success for extreme right-wing parties. This column uses evidence from three elections in Italy to quantify the impact immigration has on the political success of non-extreme right-wing parties. In the Italian case, immigration leads to bigger gains for centre-right parties than extreme right parties.

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