How retail drug markets in poor countries develop

Daniel Bennett, Wes Yin 14 August 2014

a

A

Millions of people die each year from infectious diseases like malaria, TB, HIV, and diarrhoea, many of which have drug therapies. We need effective medicine to confront the alarming burden of infectious disease in the developing world. However, many of the drugs for sale in developing countries are of poor quality. Counterfeiters sell ineffective products that imitate the appearance of established brands, while small manufacturers make and distribute substandard versions of common generics.

a

A

Topics:  Development Health economics Industrial organisation

Tags:  competition, pharmaceuticals, India, quality, asymmetric information, economies of scale, healthcare, adverse selection, drugs, medicine, market for lemons, chains

Determinants of generic medicine adoption

Joan Costa-i-Font, Alistair McGuire, Nebibe Varol 10 May 2014

a

A

With healthcare budgets around the world under pressure, switching to generics seems a natural cost saver. Generic drugs are cheaper alternatives to branded medicines, offering an obvious source of efficiency gains to any health system.

a

A

Topics:  Competition policy Health economics

Tags:  competition, pharmaceuticals, health, regulation, healthcare, drugs, medicine, generics

Do European fines deter price fixing?

Mario Mariniello 22 September 2013

a

A

Anti-cartel enforcement is the least controversial of competition-policy themes. Price fixing, market sharing and other agreements to restrict competition have obvious negative effects on welfare. Within the EU, however, industry representatives have increasingly voiced concern that the European Commission imposes excessive fines to enforce anti-cartel law – particularly since the introduction of new guidelines on fines in 2006. Fines are said to be too high, disproportionate, and liable to introduce distortions into the market, ultimately leading to higher prices for consumers.

a

A

Topics:  Competition policy EU policies

Tags:  competition, EU, Cartels, price fixing

The buyer margins of firms' exports

Jerónimo Carballo, Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano, Christian Volpe Martincus,

Date Published

Sun, 08/11/2013

a

A

Show in Editors Choice Box?

0

Display Order

0

Topics

International trade

Partners

CEPR

URL

http://www.cepr.org/pubs/dps/DP9584

Vox readers can download CEPR Discussion Paper 9584 for free here.

Journalists are entitled to free DP downloads on request; please contact pressoffice@cepr.org. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

Home Page

Display Order

0

cepr_featured

0
Tags
competition, buyer margins, market segmentation, markups

Reallocation and Technology: Evidence from the U.S. Steel Industry

Allan Collard-Wexler, Jan De Loecker,

Date Published

Sun, 02/03/2013

a

A

Show in Editors Choice Box?

0

Display Order

0

Topics

Industrial organisation

Partners

CEPR

URL

www.cepr.org/pubs/dps/DP9331.asp

Vox readers can download CEPR Discussion Paper 9331 for free here.

Journalists are entitled to free DP downloads on request; please contact pressoffice@cepr.org. To learn more about subscribing to CEPR's Discussion Paper Series, please visit the CEPR website.

Home Page

Display Order

0

cepr_featured

0
Tags
competition, productivity, technology, reallocation

Financial foul play? An analysis of UEFA’s attempts to restore financial discipline in European football

Rob Simmons 03 September 2012

a

A

As the 2012/13 football season kicks off, many fans, journalists, and social commentators will be heard saying that: a) the gap in financial resources between large and small clubs is greater than ever, b) star players at big clubs such as Barcelona, Chelsea, Real Madrid, Manchester City and Manchester United earn exorbitant salaries, and c) the finances of several clubs are out of control, as clubs that are hungry for success generate large financial losses as their spending levels on transfer fees and player salaries are driven up.

a

A

Topics:  Competition policy Frontiers of economic research

Tags:  competition, Football, sport, Financial Fair Play

Financing start-ups: The impact of credit scoring and bank concentration

Hans Degryse, Martin Brown, Daniel Hoewer, María Fabiana Penas 05 June 2012

a

A

Newly created firms and in particular high-tech start-ups are the engines of growth in many countries. Empirical evidence from the US and Europe shows that banks are the most important source of finance to new firms (Robb and Robinson 2010 for the US; Huyghebaert et al. 2000 and Colombo and Grili 2007 for Europe). However, start-up firms – low-tech and high-tech – often face difficulties in raising the required funds to implement their ideas. Some argue that banks are less willing to provide funds to start-ups, as these firms lack collateral and are more opaque (Hall 2009).

a

A

Topics:  Competition policy International finance Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  competition, banking, credit ratings, start-ups

Competition in the services sector and macroeconomic performance in the European countries: The case of Italy

Lorenzo Forni, Andrea Gerali, Massimiliano Pisani 03 April 2012

a

A

The ruthlessness with which the global crisis exposed the lack of competitiveness in many of Europe’s economies has renewed interest in ways to encourage greater competition. These reforms are usually targeted at the domestic service sectors in continental Europe, as those sectors are still heavily regulated and, in the last 15 years, have performed badly relative to other economies, such as US.

a

A

Topics:  Competition policy EU policies Europe's nations and regions

Tags:  Italy, competition, service sector

Complicated relationship between competition and innovation

Noboru Kawahama 22 March 2012

a

A

More than 20 years have passed since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Although various views exist about the cause of the failure of the socialist economy, stagnation in innovation is arguably one of the fundamental reasons. It is true that the Soviet Union once achieved a level of basic technology high enough to lead to the Sputnik crisis. But under a regime that did not allow for opportunities to cultivate consumer demand or use profit opportunities as leverage to utilise technology, innovation in general did not develop.

a

A

Topics:  Competition policy

Tags:  US, competition, Japan, innovation

Shaping risk preferences across time

Alison Booth, Patrick Nolen, Lina Cardona Sosa 20 February 2012

a

A

The majority of experimental studies investigating gender differences in risky choices find that women are less willing to take risks than men. This research is summarised in Eckel and Grossman (2008) and Croson and Gneezy (2009). However, these experimental studies investigating gender differences in risky choices typically do so only at a single point in time.

a

A

Topics:  Frontiers of economic research Gender Labour markets

Tags:  competition, risk aversion, sexism

Pages