Gordon Dahl, Roger Gordon, Thursday, May 16, 2013

Remedying a global crisis such as this requires concerted, consensual, coordinated effort. But we’re told economists are divided on what to do next. Is this true? Are we divided? This column praises efforts such as the Economic Experts Panel from the Chicago Booth School of Business. It’s from panels like this – which comprise top economists with differing political views – that we can get a sense of consensus or disagreement on major economic issues.

Daniel S. Hamermesh, Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Publishing in economics is a very tough game, especially for young scholars trying to establish a research record while on a tenure clock. This column discusses new research that shows the age profile of authors in top journals has distinctly shifted away from young scholars. In 1993, half the authors of top-level articles were under 35 and 90% were under 50. Today, only a third are under 35.

Heiner Mikosch, Stefan Neuwirth, Theo Suellow, Andres Frick, Andrea Lassmann, Sunday, June 3, 2012

How do European economists assess the economic crisis in Europe? This column presents results of a survey of members of the Association of European Conjuncture Institutes on various issues related to the European economic crisis, such as the likelihood of Greece leaving the Eurozone, the likelihood of Europe falling back into recession, and the role of the European Central Bank.

Gilles Saint-Paul, Saturday, September 19, 2009

Has economics failed us? Should economists have seen this crisis coming? This column offers a defence of contemporary economics against those demanding forecasts of crises and complaining about the profession’s mathematical intensity. It says that the economy’s extraordinary complexity necessitates that economists remain modest, not that they abandon their training for a multidisciplinary melting pot.

Alvin E. Roth, Tuesday, October 16, 2012

In this Vox Talk from 2008, Alvin Roth talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about some of the research for which he was recently awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences (with Lloyd Shapley). They discuss his work designing markets for kidney exchange, mechanisms for school choice in New York and Boston, and efficient systems for getting doctors and economists into their first jobs. Roth also explains the significance of repugnance as a constraint on markets.

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