Wouter den Haan, Martin Ellison, Ethan Ilzetzki, Michael McMahon, Ricardo Reis, 12 August 2016

The outcome of the UK’s referendum on EU membership has prompted much soul-searching in the economics profession, which was nearly unanimous in anticipating negative economic consequences from a vote for Brexit. This column presents the July 2016 Centre for Macroeconomics survey of experts, which asked for views on the role played by economic arguments in the referendum outcome, and whether institutional change is needed in the way that the findings of academic economic research – and the views of the profession as a whole – are communicated. While opinions are divided, many of the respondents who do not advocate institutional change still see considerable problems in the relationship of the academic macroeconomic community with policymakers and the public at large.

Ali Önder, Hakan Yilmazkuday, 04 June 2016

North American economics departments produce a substantial amount of economics PhDs, and these PhDs are responsible for a disproportionately large share of research published in top academic journals. This column provides an overview of 35 years of peer-reviewed publications by North American economics PhDs. Since 1980, the size of author teams grown and female representation steadily improved. The shares of the major research fields show relatively little variation, though international economics, development economics, and finance are exceptions to this.

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Nobel Prizes in Economics Joseph Stiglitz, Angus Deaton and Michael Spence will lecture at the I.S.E.O International Summer School 2016 focused on "Looking forward: new challenges and opportunities for the World Economy”. The course takes place in a wonderful location in northern Italy and it's promoted by I.S.E.O Institute chaired by Robert Solow. Post graduate students, young economists and researchers are eligible. Partial scholarships available. Info www.istiseo.org or [email protected].

Co-Pierre Georg, Michael Rose, 16 January 2016

Informal collaboration is an integral part of academia. Studies of academic collaboration have mostly focused on formal collaboration, as measured by co-authorships. This column instead constructs a network of informal collaboration in financial economics, exploiting acknowledgements of assistance appearing in published papers. Three rankings of financial economists are constructed based on acknowledgement occurrence and centrality. Being helpful is not found to predict centrality in the informal collaboration network.

Wendy Carlin, David Soskice, 25 October 2012

Is economic teaching keeping up with the changing economy? This column presents a new way of teaching economics in light of the continuing crises. It argues that if we are to create a better-informed public debate we must begin by improving the economics curriculum and our students’ ability and their willingness to communicate about economic ideas and issues.

Diane Coyle, 19 September 2012

Five years after Lehman’s collapse, economics is under fire both from outside and inside the profession for irrelevance, arrogance and more. This column introduces a new Vox debate focused on two questions: What’s the use of economics, and how should we be teaching it to the next generation?

Gilles Saint-Paul, 19 September 2009

Has economics failed us? Should economists have seen this crisis coming? This column offers a defence of contemporary economics against those demanding forecasts of crises and complaining about the profession’s mathematical intensity. It says that the economy’s extraordinary complexity necessitates that economists remain modest, not that they abandon their training for a multidisciplinary melting pot.

Daron Acemoglu, 12 January 2009

In a new Policy Insight, CEPR Research Fellow Daron Acemoglu provides his views on what intellectual errors have been made and what lessons these errors offer moving forward from the crisis of 2008.

Daron Acemoglu, 12 January 2009

The global crisis is a challenge to and an opportunity for the economics profession. Here one of the profession’s most innovative thinkers reflects on how and why economists failed to see the crisis coming, what they should tell governments to do about it, and what young economists should be working on to help us avoid future crises.

Johan Lagerlöf, Andrew Seltzer, 09 August 2008

Economics is mathematically intensive, and mathematically underprepared economics students are sure to struggle. Unfortunately, this column reports, at least one UK remedial course did little to help its students.

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