Trevon Logan, John Parman, 09 March 2015

Racial disparities in socioeconomic conditions remain a major policy issue throughout the world. This column applies a new neighbour-based measure of residential segregation to US census data from 1880 and 1940. The authors find that existing measures understate the extent of segregation, and that segregation increased in rural as well as urban areas. The dramatic decline in opposite-race neighbours during the 20th century may help to explain the persistence of racial inequality in the US.

Edward Glaeser, 05 September 2008

Edward Glaeser of Harvard University talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about the lessons from his research on how falling costs of communication and transportation have been kind to idea-producing cities like New York, Boston and London and devastating to goods-producing cities like Cleveland, Detroit and Glasgow. The interview was recorded at the American Economic Association meetings in New Orleans in January 2008.

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