Mario Crucini, Gregor Smith, 05 September 2016

Commodity price convergence is often seen as the best way to measure the integration of markets that defines globalisation. This column reviews research on historical prices and also presents intranational evidence from Sweden from 1732 to 1914. Price convergence appears to date to the 18th century, well before the adoption of the telegraph or the railway. For emerging economies today, intranational price convergence arising from declining internal distance effects may be a precursor to globalisation.

Federico Etro, 23 December 2011

To some, the world of art and world of economics are diametrically opposed. To others, such as the author of this column, they are part of the same. This column looks at the wages of painters during the 17th century Baroque art movement and asks what insights it can provide for art lovers, economists, and those who consider themselves both.

Dimitri Vayanos, Denis Gromb, 10 April 2010

Why do financial market anomalies arise and persist? This column summarises a new thread in financial economics – the "limits of arbitrage" literature – explaining how financial institutions sometimes lack the capital needed to arbitrage away anomolies. This new approach has far-reaching implications for our understanding of how financial markets work and how they should be regulated.

Farooq Akram, Dagfinn Rime, Lucio Sarno, 25 October 2008

If markets are efficient, then there are no exploitable arbitrage opportunities. But if no one engages in arbitrage, then what eliminates such exploitable opportunities? This column puts international financial markets under the microscope and shows that arbitrage opportunities exist, but they are usually eliminated in less than five minutes. Such micro-arbitrage makes the assumption of no arbitrage safe for those looking at the bigger picture.

Events