, 06 September 2017

Will the UK remain in the EU's customs union? This video explains the implications of remaining in the customs union, and how it would affect trade. This video was recorded at the UK Trade Policy Observatory at the University of Sussex (UKTPO) in August 2017.

The Editors, 30 March 2017

This column introduces a new series – CEPR Flashbacks – which highlights past CEPR reports that are relevant to today’s challenges. In many cases, the analysis is highly pertinent to today’s policy questions, while in others the reports provide useful context on how leading thinkers approached similar problems in the past. The first CEPR Flashback highlights a 1995 report, “Flexible Integration”, which suggested a solution to the problem that EU leaders are tackling in their current reflection on the Future of Europe.

Richard Pomfret, Patricia Sourdin, 23 September 2016

Joining a customs union is supposed to reduce trade with third countries. But after 2004, the largest EU accession countries actually increased their trade with Australia, especially their exports. This column argues that new regional value chains made accession country industries more competitive, especially in the auto industry. Trade with Australia has also been facilitated by a drop in the costs of bilateral international trade.

Michalis Haliassos, 05 May 2016

The free movement of people within the EU implies that individuals are confronted with unfamiliar policies and institutions. Can we expect them to adjust to these new sets of rules? In this Vox Views video, Michael Haliassos discusses his research on the role of cultural predispositions in household financial behaviour and the implications for the harmonisation of institutions across European countries. The video was recorded in April 2016 at the First Annual Spring Symposium on Financial Economics organised by CEPR and the Brevan Howard Centre at Imperial College.

Ettore Dorrucci, Demosthenes Ioannou, Francesco Mongelli, Alessio Terzi, 15 April 2015

Despite a significant progress over the past decades, European integration still needs improvement in some areas. This column presents a long-term narrative of European integration by using a recently published European index of regional institutional integration. The index maps developments in European integration from 1958 to early 2015 on the basis of a new monthly dataset. The evidence shows that successful integration could be achieved with reforms that are inclusive, widely explained, understood, and accepted.

Morris Goldstein, 18 November 2014

Results from last month’s EU-wide stress test are reassuring, especially for countries at Europe’s core. This column warns against a rosy interpretation. The test relies on risk-weighted measures of bank capital ratios that have been shown to be less predictive of bank failure than unweighted leverage ratios – a metric already adopted by the US Fed and Bank of England. In addition, many experts recommend much higher leverage ratios than currently required. The ECB must do more to fix undercapitalisation.

Kevin O'Rourke, 14 June 2008

The Irish ‘no’ – like the 2005 French ‘non’ – shows a clear poor/rich and urban/rural divide. Working-class and rural voters are systematically voting against further European integration. European leaders should take note.

Jim Rollo, Michael Gasiorek, Peter Holmes, 30 November 2007

EU-India trade talks began well in June 2007. India’s rapidly expanding role in the world economy as a buyer and seller make this an important free trade agreement for the EU, as recent research shows, but prospects for success are uncertain.

Alan Ahearne, Barry Eichengreen, 18 October 2007

Europe has no shortage of opinions on international economic affairs, but these suffer from a shortage of impact. The EU could become more influential by reforming its external representation. The IMF is the place to start. Here is a proposal.

Simon Evenett, 01 May 2007

The world trade system is challenged by large developing countries exercising their newfound powers. The EU needs to identify the offensive and defensive interests of the new trade powers, identify common ground, and adjust EU trade strategy to the new realities.

Events