Trade preferences as catalytic aid

Ivan Cherkashin, Svetlana Demidova, Hiau Looi Kee, Kala Krishna 19 February 2011

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When the US granted duty free/quota free access to Madagascar under the African Growth and Opportunity Act 2000, exports from Madagascar exploded, from $170 million in 2000 to $500 million in 2004. Over the same period, Madagascar’s export to the rest of the world also increased, from $750 million to $875 million (Figure 1). Similarly, when the EU granted duty free/quota free access to Bangladesh under the Everything But Arms Initiative in 2001, knitwear exports from Bangladesh to the EU more than doubled, from $1.3 billion in 2000 to $3 billion in 2004.

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Topics:  International trade

Tags:  US, EU, trade preferences, protectionism, Madagascar, Bangladesh

Trade in intermediates and economic policy

Shimelse Ali, Uri Dadush 09 February 2011

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Intermediate inputs – the parts and materials imported to make products for consumption domestically and abroad – are a growing force in world trade. Catalysed by the globalisation of production, the large and rapidly increasing use of imported inputs for exports has important policy implications. Bilateral trade balances are not appropriately measured, the costs of protection are higher than often understood, trade is more volatile, and the importance of exports as drivers of short-term demand is overestimated.

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Topics:  International trade

Tags:  protectionism, Intermediate inputs

Entry regulation: Still costly

Markus Poschke 29 January 2011

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For most affected countries, the recent European debt crisis at its root is also a growth crisis. It is then only appropriate that structural reforms and deregulation be still on the agenda. For instance, costs due to entry regulation are still relatively high in some continental European countries, with large knock-on effects on aggregate output and productivity.

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Topics:  International trade Microeconomic regulation

Tags:  barriers to trade, protectionism

Are capital controls effective?

Eduardo Levy Yeyati 20 January 2011

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“Not only are they ineffective but, in addition, they raise domestic interest rates.” This type of internally inconsistent commentary is not unusual when discussing capital controls – a subject marked with strong beliefs and weak data. Now that the G20 has sanctioned capital controls in Seoul under the umbrella of macro-prudential policies, it is a good time to revisit the subject of controls in a dispassionate way (G20 2010).1

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Topics:  International finance

Tags:  US, protectionism, capital controls, Chile, Argentina

Argentina’s border emergency-kit in times of global crisis: In case of fire, break the glass

Demián Dalle, Federico Lavopa 11 January 2011

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After the outbreak of the global financial and economic crisis in mid-2008, unilateral and discriminatory trade measures multiplied in number. Developed countries put in place gigantic stimulus packages, some high- and middle-income countries set up catchall tariff and non-tariff measures, while those that had been applying import-duty rates below bound levels raised them up to bound ceilings.

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Topics:  International trade

Tags:  protectionism, Global Trade Alert, Argentina

Crisis protectionism: The observed trade impact

Brad McDonald, Christian Henn 22 December 2010

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The global financial crisis brought with it fear. No small amount of it was focused on the possibility of extreme 1930s-style protectionism. Thanks to an ambitious macroeconomic policy response and strong global trade institutions, the worst fears have been avoided, at least for the time being (Eichengreen and Irwin 2009).

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Topics:  Global crisis International trade

Tags:  international trade, protectionism, Global Trade Alert

What can we realistically expect from the G20?

Simon J Evenett 12 November 2010

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US President George W Bush called the first crisis-related Heads of Government meeting in November 2008. The current incarnation of the G20 is entitled, therefore, to celebrate its second birthday at the forthcoming summit in Seoul. Over the past month, however, concerns have been raised about the health of this infant. Alternatively, parents may recognise the phrase ‘the terrible two’s” suggesting a more vibrant, if not necessarily easygoing, way ahead. What then should analysts realistically expect of the G20?

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Topics:  Global governance

Tags:  G20, protectionism, global governance

Chinese firm and industry reactions to antidumping

Chunding Li, John Whalley 11 November 2010

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Over the last decade, China has been the target for the largest number of antidumping measures of any country in the world. With the onset of the global crisis, antidumping has becomes even more in vogue (Bown 2010). How China reacts to these measures and the knock-on effects for other countries is becoming increasingly important.

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Topics:  International trade

Tags:  China, antidumping, protectionism

The state of protectionism on the eve of the Seoul G20 summit

Simon J Evenett 08 November 2010

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If media coverage is anything to go by, October 2010 saw a resurgence of fears about protectionism. Concerns that unheeded complaints about the Chinese exchange-rate regime would ultimately provoke other countries to resort to competitive devaluations and more traditional forms of trade protectionism came to the fore. Protectionism has not received this much attention in the press since the first quarter of 2009.

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Topics:  International trade

Tags:  G20, protectionism, Global Trade Alert, currency dispute

Tensions Contained... For Now: The 8th GTA Report

Simon J Evenett,

Date Published

Mon, 11/08/2010

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Tensions Contained... For Now: The 8th Global Trade Alert Report can be downloaded here.

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protectionism, Global Trade Alert, currency dispute, murky protectionsim

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