Richard Layard, 17 October 2016

What is one of the biggest causes of low well-being in the UK? Richard Layard explains why treating mental illnesses should be on the public agenda. This video was recorded at the Centre for Economic Performance in September 2014.

Isamu Yamamoto, 14 October 2016

There is ample empirical evidence showing that poor mental health is increasing, but the impact of this on long-run productivity and its implications for the labour market are not well researched. This column outlines two ways in which labour market research can contribute to the study of the impact on mental health of working conditions. It also identifies several channels related to working conditions that affect mental health, and argues that deteriorating mental health adversely affects corporate performance in the long run.

Italo Colantone, Rosario Crinò, Laura Ogliari, 04 December 2015

Influential studies have shown that trade liberalisation is associated with substantial adjustment costs for workers in import-competing jobs. This column uses UK data to shed light on one such cost that has not been considered to date – subjective well-being. Import competition is found to substantially raise mental distress, through worsened labour market conditions and increased stress on the job. These findings provide evidence of an important hidden cost of globalisation.

Prashant Bharadwaj, Mallesh Pai, Agne Suziedelyte, 03 July 2015

Fear of stigmatisation might lead to hiding of behaviours and actions. This column presents evidence that stigma concerns can play a role in health seeking behaviour in the case of mental health. In particular, survey respondents under-report mental health conditions 36% of the time when asked about mental health conditions, and about 20% of the time when asked about prescription drug use. Conditions such as diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are less likely to be under-reported.

Sarah Stewart-Brown, 11 November 2012

Eating fruit and vegetables could be good for your mental health. This column explores the evidence, arguing that better surveys need to be carried out if we are to accurately establish causality. If we can understand how mental health is linked to diet, the benefits to the public – and those who decide public policy – could be huge.

Jan van Ours, Jenny Williams, 19 September 2009

There is growing evidence of a link between mental health problems and cannabis use. Is it causal? This column shows that cannabis use, particularly frequent use, does have an adverse effect on mental health. Unobserved factors that make individuals more likely to use cannabis do also make them more susceptible to mental illness, but using marijuana has an additional causal impact.