Institutions, trade shocks, and regional differences in long-run educational and development trajectories

André Carlos Martínez, Aldo Musacchio, Martina Viarengo 09 July 2014

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Understanding the determinants of long-run socio-economic development is a major concern for academics and policymakers in many countries around the world. In particular, beyond understanding differences in development or educational and other outcomes across countries, the origins of within-country inequality are now a fundamental issue, given the impact inequality has on the long-run prosperity of nations.

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Topics:  Development Economic history Education

Tags:  development, education, growth, institutions, Inequality, Brazil, colonialism, trade shocks, extractive institutions

British and French educational legacies in Africa

Denis Cogneau, Alexander Moradi 17 May 2014

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Britain and France followed two very distinct approaches to education in their African colonies (Garner and Schafer 2006).

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Topics:  Development Economic history Education

Tags:  Africa, institutions, colonialism, West Africa

Colonialism and development in Africa

Leander Heldring, James A Robinson 10 January 2013

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The Berlin Conference of 1884-1885 formalised what has become known as the ‘Scramble for Africa’. European powers arbitrarily divided up Africa between themselves and started administrating their new colonies. Seventy years later they bequeathed to native Africans countries that looked remarkably different from how they looked in 1880. And, albeit with some exceptions, these countries are among the poorest in the world today. 

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Topics:  Development Economic history

Tags:  development, Africa, colonialism

China’s soaring foreign trade: Made in Britain, c. 1840?

Wolfgang Keller, Ben Li, Carol H Shiue 19 December 2010

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 Talk about market access restrictions. Until the year 1840, China’s international trade was limited to only a handful of local firms in a single port, Canton (Guangzhou). That did not sit well with Western countries who wanted to import more and more silk and porcelain from China in exchange for Western goods. Trade liberalisation came swiftly in the form of British gunboats. After defeat in the Opium War (1840-42), China was forced to open its economy to foreign trade at a large number of so-called treaty ports. Soon after, China’s foreign trade started growing rapidly.

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Topics:  Development Economic history

Tags:  China, international trade, colonialism, gains from trade

The diplomacy of arms: Conflict as a negotiation instrument

Santiago Sanchez-Pages 24 September 2010

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Why do people fight? Why do countries, firms, unions, and individuals engage in costly confrontations? One line of argument states that humans enjoy fighting per se, because it is in a fundamental part of our violent and dark nature. A more appealing explanation is that people fight to get something out of it.

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Topics:  Frontiers of economic research Politics and economics

Tags:  war, Conflict, colonialism, bargaining

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