DynEmp: New cross-country evidence on the role of young firms in job creation, growth, and innovation

Chiara Criscuolo, Peter N. Gal, Carlo Menon 26 May 2014

a

A

Since well before the crisis, many OECD economies have been confronted with sluggish productivity growth. In the aftermath of the crisis, job creation has also stalled and has become an important policy issue. Business dynamics are at the core of the creative destruction process. Available evidence points to significant cross-country heterogeneity in the dynamism of businesses, even after taking into account differences in sectoral composition. This raises policymakers’ interest in understanding the role of framework conditions in this area.

a

A

Topics:  Labour markets Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  R&D, employment, growth, OECD, job creation, business cycles, firms, start-ups

Firm age, investment opportunities, and job creation

Manuel Adelino, Song Ma, David Robinson 12 February 2014

a

A

Economists have long been concerned with understanding how firms respond to changing investment opportunities. Indeed, this question is central to ongoing policy discussions about economic growth and job creation, since the way firms create jobs is by increasing investment and employment in response to new economic opportunities. The startup process and economic growth are deeply interconnected – over the last 30 years, young firms were responsible for almost all net job creation in the economy (Haltiwanger et al. 2009, 2013, Stangler and Litan 2009).

a

A

Topics:  Financial markets Labour markets Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  employment, US, growth, entrepreneurship, job creation, firm age

Who creates jobs?

Ejaz Ghani, William Kerr, Stephen D O'Connell 04 December 2011

a

A

The role of entrepreneurs in job creation has a long intellectual tradition (Cantillion 1730, Knight 1921, Schumpeter 1942). While the great economic minds throughout history recognised the link between entrepreneurship, regional development, and job creation, controversies remain. Our understanding of entrepreneurship is still at an early stage (Glaeser et al 2009, Klapper and Love 2011). How does one quantify entrepreneurship? Do young/small establishments or large/established firms contribute to job growth?

a

A

Topics:  Development Labour markets

Tags:  India, job creation

Does fiscal policy matter? Is there a better way to reduce unemployment?

Roger E. A. Farmer , Dmitry Plotnikov 05 September 2011

a

A

Economic theories that lack an independent role for business and consumer confidence have difficulty explaining the cause of financial crises like the Great Depression or the Great Recession (e.g. Woodford 2003, Kydland and Prescott 1982).1 Both economic calamities were preceded by large drops in asset prices that were not associated with any fundamental trigger.

a

A

Topics:  Global crisis Labour markets Macroeconomic policy

Tags:  job creation, fiscal policy, fiscal stimulus, multiplier effect

German recovery – it’s the supply-side but not government labour market and welfare state reforms

Wendy Carlin, David Soskice 14 August 2007

a

A

There is no consensus about the roots of the current German economic recovery. By contrast, two years ago in July 2005, there was unanimity amongst over 240 leading German academic economists who were signatories of a diagnosis and policy prescription. The state of the German economy was characterised as a deep, structural crisis and the demand was for drastic and painful reforms.

a

A

Topics:  Europe's nations and regions

Tags:  Germany, job creation, German recovery

German recovery: it’s the supply side

Michael Burda 23 July 2007

a

A

After almost a decade of slump, the German economy is finally growing again. Between 1995 and 2005, annual real growth averaged a meagre 1.4%, compared with 3.2% in the US, 2.9% in the UK, 2.1% in France and Denmark and 2.7% in the Netherlands. Clearly the “sick man of Europe,” Germany logged less than a third of EU’s overall cumulative rate of GDP increase over the same period. Now things look different: Growth in 2007 might top 3% in 2007, and many now expect the recovery to persist for several years.

a

A

Topics:  Europe's nations and regions

Tags:  Germany, growth, productivity, job creation