Nauro Campos, 26 April 2014

Nauro Campos talks to Viv Davies about his recent research with Fabrizio Coricelli and Luigi Moretti that, using data from the various enlargements since the 1970s, yields new results about the benefits that both rich and relatively poor countries, with the exception of Greece, have derived from becoming EU members. Campos estimates the gain in per capita GDP to be approximately 12%. The interview was recorded on 10 April 2014.

Nauro Campos, Fabrizio Coricelli, Luigi Moretti, 09 April 2014

In the wake of the recent crisis, the debate about the economic benefits from EU membership has intensified. This column presents new results about the benefits countries derive from becoming EU members, using data from the 1980s and 2004 enlargements. There are substantial positive pay-offs, with a gain in per capita GDP of approximately 12%. Despite differences across countries, the evidence shows that the benefits of EU membership outweighed the costs for most countries – except for Greece. An important research question would be to identify factors that allow countries to better exploit EU entry.

Nauro Campos, Fabrizio Coricelli, Luigi Moretti, 27 April 2016

One common concern about membership of the EU is the notion that poorer members have more to gain than richer ones. This column focuses on the countries that joined the EU in 1973 (Denmark, UK and Ireland) and in 1995 (Austria, Finland and Sweden). The authors estimate that these rich countries benefited substantially from joining the EU. Furthermore, while the benefits from EU membership to poorer countries tend to be mostly in terms of per capita income, for richer countries the benefits tend to be mostly in terms of productivity.

Anzelika Zaiceva, Klaus F. Zimmermann, 28 July 2008

The authors of CEPR DP6921 look at migration within the EU, before and after the 2004 enlargement. In particular, they assess the scale and drivers of migration, and the composition of the migrants before the enlargement, and look at how this has changed post-enlargement.

Helge Berger, Volker Nitsch, 30 May 2008

The European Central Bank’s Governing Council continues to expand as new economies adopt the euro. This column presents empirical evidence that the optimal central bank committee size is seven to ten members – far fewer than the 22 members the ECB will have come 2009.

Michael Emerson, 15 November 2006

Written in November 2006, this essay discusses what is meant by the curious but critical phrase 'absorptive capacity.'

Richard Baldwin, 17 May 2007

Formal criteria don’t define the limits of Europe; they only delay the membership of determined applicants. The true limit is the EU’s capacity to absorb newcomers. Eastern enlargement challenged this capacity, but the forthcoming institutional reforms that allow the EU27 to function will – quite inadvertently – make it easier to enlarge the EU further. EU42 anyone?