Hersh Shefrin, 12 October 2017

Richard Thaler of the University of Chicago has been awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences “for his contributions to behavioural economics”. This column, written by his first behavioural collaborator, provides a personal perspective on the development of three key areas of research to which the new laureate has been a major contributor: people’s limited rationality, their perceptions about fairness, and their lack of self-control.

Kevin Bryan, 01 November 2016

Oliver Hart has been jointly awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences with Bengt Holmström “for their contributions to contract theory”. This column outlines his contributions to our understanding of the nature of the firm.

Maija Halonen-Akatwijuka, 29 October 2016

Oliver Hart has been jointly awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences with Bengt Holmström "for their contributions to contract theory". This column discusses his contributions, focusing particularly on incomplete contracts.

Kevin Bryan, 23 October 2016

Bengt Holmström has been jointly awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences with Oliver Hart “for their contributions to contract theory”. This column outlines his key contributions.

Pierre Régibeau, Katharine Rockett, 13 October 2016

Systematic assessments of the research performance of academic institutions are increasingly common around the world. A key question for the design of such systems is whether and how bibliometrics should be incorporated. This column argues that bibliometrics can perform well at identifying quality in some fields, while providing cost-effective and transparent review. Peer review is found to be no guarantor of quality, though it may be essential in the evaluation of certain fields.

Philippe Aghion, 19 January 2015

Jean Tirole’s Nobel was for his transformative work on industrial organisation. In this Vox Talk Philippe Aghion talks about Tirole’s contribution. The interview was recorded in November 2014.

Tarun Ramadorai, 24 October 2013

The 2013 Nobel laureates’ work has greatly improved our understanding of asset markets. Their blend of rigorous statistical analysis, economic theory, and respect for ‘market wisdom’ has provided a huge impetus to the field of empirical asset pricing – one of the most important and active areas of economics research. The insights gained in this field have important real-world implications, helping individuals to make better investment decisions and policymakers to design more appropriate financial regulations.

Marianne Andries, Bruno Biais, 21 October 2013

The 2013 Nobel Prize in economics goes to Lars Hansen, Eugene Fama, and Robert Shiller. This column describes the significance of their contributions in the context of the broader literature. The prizes are well deserved. Their careful investigation of data – informed by deep understanding of theory – taught us much of what we know about asset pricing.

Toshiaki Watanabe, 29 November 2011

In October 2011, Christopher Sims of Princeton University shared the Nobel Prize for economics with Thomas Sargent of New York University “for their empirical research on cause and effect in the macroeconomy”. This column by one of Professor Sims’ former students – now a distinguished professor – discusses the importance of his work.

Ramon Marimon, 16 October 2011

The 2011 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences has been awarded to Thomas Sargent and Christopher Sims. This column summarises the importance of their contributions to macroeconomic analysis and policymaking.

Barbara Petrongolo, 15 October 2010

The 2010 Nobel Prize in Economics has been awarded to Peter Diamond, Dale Mortensen, and Christopher Pissarides "for their analysis of markets with search frictions". This column explains how their research relates to fundamental economic issues that are both at the core of the wellbeing of society at large and now near the top of many policymakers’ agendas.

Jota Ishikawa, 31 January 2009

This column reflects on the Nobel Prize awarded to Paul Krugman, whose solo win surprised some. It comments on the relevance of Krugman’s contributions to new trade theory and new economic geography. The latter have been of particular interest to European economists.

Avinash Dixit, 17 October 2008

Krugman the columnist offers strong views, attracting adulation and hatred. His newspaper-reading fans delight in his Nobel Prize; his foes are shocked and dismayed. Both are mistaken. His prize has nothing to do with his popular writing. Here one of the world’s most influential theorists explains that the prize celebrates Krugman’s achievements in science, not in the policy arena. This column clarifies exactly what those achievements are.

Patrick Legros, Estelle Cantillon, 18 October 2007

Mechanism design theory is a major breakthrough in the modern economic analysis of institutions and markets. It revolutionalised the way economists think about optimal institutions and regulation when governments don't “know it all.” It has had a major impact on current policy-making and will continue to do so in the future.

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