Shadow banking and the economy

Alan Moreira, Alexi Savov 16 September 2014

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Shadow banking, what is it good for? At the epicentre of the global financial crisis, shadow banking has become the focus of intense regulatory scrutiny. All reform proposals implicitly take a stance on its economic value.

According to the prevailing regulatory arbitrage and neglected risks views, it doesn’t have any – shadow banking is about evading capital requirements, exploiting ‘too big to fail’, and marketing risky securities as safe to unwitting investors. The right response is to bring shadow banking into the regulatory and supervisory regime that covers insured banks.

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Topics:  Financial markets Global crisis Macroeconomic policy

Tags:  shadow banking, banking, financial crisis, global crisis, regulatory arbitrage, liquidity transformation, financial stability, externalities, collateral, business cycle, financial regulation, financial fragility, liquidity, liquidity crunch

Restoring financial stability with economic growth

James Boughton 15 September 2014

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No one would argue seriously any longer that the international financial system is working just fine. When the politicians and central bankers who govern the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank gather in Washington this October, much of the talk will be about the refusal of the US Congress to pass legislation that would reform the IMF.

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Topics:  Global governance International finance

Tags:  economic growth, financial stability, institutions, IMF, G20

Compliance with risk targets – will the Volcker Rule be effective?

Jussi Keppo, Josef Korte 07 September 2014

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Full compliance?

The Volcker Rule, passed as part of the Dodd–Frank Act in July 2010, has been appraised as one of the most important changes to banking regulation since the global financial crisis. By restricting banks’ business models and prohibiting allegedly risky activities, the rule ultimately aims at increasing resolvability and reducing imprudent risk-taking by banks, and therefore at increasing financial stability. This is done by banning banks from proprietary trading and limiting their investments in hedge funds and private equity.

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Topics:  Financial markets Microeconomic regulation

Tags:  banking, regulation, Volcker rule, Dodd–Frank, banking regulation, proprietary trading, risk, hedging, financial stability

New-breed global investors and emerging-market financial stability

Gaston Gelos, Hiroko Oura 23 August 2014

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The investor base matters since different investors behave differently. During the emerging-market sell-off episodes in 2013 and early 2014:

  • Retail-oriented mutual funds withdrew aggressively, but investors from different regions also tended to behave differently;
  • Institutional investors such as pension funds and insurance companies with long-term strategies broadly maintained their emerging-market investments.

Figure 1 shows the facts.

Figure 1. Bond flows to emerging-market economies 

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Topics:  Financial markets International finance

Tags:  Pension Funds, financial stability, capital flows, investment, emerging markets, financial deepening, herding, original sin, mutual funds, institutional investors

Why is financial stability essential for key currencies in the international monetary system?

Linda Goldberg, Signe Krogstrup, John Lipsky, Hélène Rey 26 July 2014

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Could the dollar lose its status as the key international currency for international trade and international financial transactions, and if so, what would be the principal contributing factors? Speculation about this issue has long been abundant, and views diverse. After the introduction of the euro, there was much public debate about the euro displacing the dollar (Frankel 2008). The monitoring and analysis included in the ECB’s reports on “The International Role of the Euro” (e.g.

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Topics:  Financial markets International finance

Tags:  reserve currency, financial stability, dollar, capital flows, spillovers, Currency, SIFIs

Financial stability and monetary policy

Gabriel Chodorow-Reich 27 July 2014

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In the winter of 2008, the Federal Reserve began an unprecedented campaign to combat the economic downturn. The mix of policy instruments included a near zero federal funds rate, explicit communication regarding the forward path of the funds rate, and a balance sheet that ballooned to more than $4 trillion as of this writing. With memories of the 2008-09 financial crisis still fresh, the policies have prompted concern for their effect on financial stability (Bernanke 2013, Stein 2013, Fisher 2014, Yellen 2014).

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Topics:  Financial markets Monetary policy

Tags:  financial stability, mutual funds, life insurance

Repairing the transmission of monetary policy through asset-backed securitisation

Markus K Brunnermeier, Yuliy Sannikov 03 June 2014

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Recent data show a decline in credit to small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) and private loans. Lack of credit growth to productive firms is one of the main obstacles to reignite the European growth engine.

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Topics:  Monetary policy

Tags:  monetary policy, price stability, financial stability, securitisation, risk premia, asset backed securities

Spillovers from systemic bank defaults

Mark Mink, Jakob de Haan 24 May 2014

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Financial-crisis management and prevention policies often focus on mitigating spillovers from the default of systemically important banks. During the recent crisis, governments avoided large bank failures by insuring and purchasing intermediaries’ troubled assets, by providing them with capital injections, and even by outright nationalisations. After the crisis, financial regulators designed additional requirements for those institutions that the Financial Stability Board designated as globally systemically important banks (G-SIBs).

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Topics:  Financial markets

Tags:  financial stability, spillovers, regulation, banking, banks, systemic risk

The two faces of cross-border banking flows: An investigation into the links between global risk, arms-length funding, and internal capital markets

Dennis Reinhardt, Steven Riddiough 07 May 2014

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Following the collapse of Lehman Brothers in September 2008, global risk spiked and the world witnessed a collapse in cross-border funding between banks. On closer inspection, however, not all countries’ banking systems experienced a withdrawal of cross-border finance. In fact, a number actually enjoyed an inflow of funding from banks overseas (Figure 1).

Figure 1 Cross-border bank-to-bank flows following the collapse of Lehman Brothers

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Topics:  Financial markets International finance

Tags:  financial stability, banking, Wholesale funding, interbank lending, Cross-border lending, cross-border banking

Exploring the transmission channels of contagious bank runs

Martin Brown, Stefan Trautmann, Razvan Vlahu 10 April 2014

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Financial contagion – the situation in which liquidity or insolvency risk is transmitted from one financial institution to another – is viewed by policymakers and academics as a key source of systemic risk in the banking sector. In particular, the events in the 2007–2009 Global Crisis have turned the attention of policymakers towards the potential contagion of liquidity withdrawals across banks and the resulting implications for financial stability.

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Topics:  Financial markets

Tags:  experimental economics, financial stability, financial crisis, global crisis, banking, contagion, banks, systemic risk, bank runs

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