African growth looking forward

Marco Annunziata 16 August 2014

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Views on Africa’s growth prospects have jumped from utter pessimism to extreme enthusiasm. The latter has been centre-stage with the US–Africa Summit hosted in Washington DC from 4–6 August 2014, with the participation of top political and business leaders. My coauthors Todd Johnson and Shlomi Kramer and I have tried to take a sober assessment of Africa’s progress and prospects, looking beyond the current hype and the inevitable frustration that doing business in the region still generates (Annunziata et al. 2014).

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Topics:  Development

Tags:  development, growth, Africa, human capital, trade, innovation, infrastructure, commodity boom

Agglomeration and product innovation in China

Hongyong Zhang 21 July 2014

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Spatial agglomeration of economic activities is generally assumed to improve productivity and spur firms’ innovation through localisation economies and urbanisation economies.1 There is an extensive empirical literature investigating the effects of localisation and urbanisation on firm-level productivity. Despite its economic importance, there are few empirical studies focusing on agglomeration and product innovation. Feldman and Audretsch (1999) and De Beule and Van Beveren (2010) are two of the few exceptions.

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Topics:  Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  R&D, productivity, China, spatial concentration, innovation, subsidies, clusters, agglomeration

Protection of intellectual property to foster innovations in the service sector

Masayuki Morikawa 20 July 2014

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Given the declining labour force due to population ageing, accelerating the productivity growth of industries – especially the service industries – is an important element of the growth strategy in Japan and most advanced countries. While there are a variety of factors affecting productivity, innovation is one of the key determinants of productivity growth. However, innovation in the service sector has not been studied well. I present findings on innovation in the service sector by focusing on the effect of intellectual property rights on innovation.

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Topics:  Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  R&D, growth, productivity, patents, Japan, innovation, services, intellectual property, trade secrets

Trust-based working time spurs innovation

Holger Görg, Olivier N. Godart, Aoife Hanley, Christiane Krieger-Boden 08 July 2014

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The organisation of work has changed dramatically over the last few decades. In particular, the formerly rigidly regulated working time has been replaced by flexible working hour schemes in numerous firms around the world. Taking Germany as an example, in 2010, 36% of employees were entitled to some form of flexible working hours scheme (Figure 1).

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Topics:  Health economics Labour markets Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  Germany, working hours, trust, health, innovation, motivation, overtime, flexibility, working time

R&D internationalisation during the Global Crisis

Bernhard Dachs, Georg Zahradnik 06 July 2014

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Foreign firms’ share of total business R&D expenditure increased during the last three decades in almost all countries where data is available, but this trend stopped with the Global Crisis of 2008–2009. In most countries, R&D of foreign firms was more severely affected by the crisis than R&D of domestic firms. However, the crisis did not lead to a new global distribution of overseas R&D expenditure.

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Topics:  Global crisis Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  R&D, globalisation, multinationals, FDI, innovation, global crisis, persistence, autonomy, subsidiaries

How highly educated immigrants raise native wages

Giovanni Peri, Kevin Shih, Chad Sparber 29 May 2014

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Immigration to the US has risen tremendously in recent decades. Though media attention and popular discourse often focus on illegal immigrants or the high foreign-born presence among less-educated workers, the data show that immigrants are drawn from both ends of the education spectrum. At the low end, immigrants grew from 5% of workers with a high school degree or less in 1970 to 20.8% in 2010. At the high end, the figure rose from 7.3% to 18.2% for those with graduate degrees over the same period.1

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Topics:  Labour markets Migration Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  US, growth, productivity, wages, immigration, innovation, complementarities, STEM

The locust and the bee: predators and creators in capitalism's future

Geoff Mulgan interviewed by Romesh Vaitilingam,

Date Published

Fri, 04/11/2014

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See Also

Mulgan, G (2014) The Locust and the Bee: Predators and Creators in Capitalism's Future. Princeton University Press 

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Topics

Politics and economics
Tags
innovation, financial crisis, political uncertainty

Related Article(s)

Redistribution, inequality, and sustainable growth The price of political uncertainty The puzzling pervasiveness of dysfunctional banking The great escape from death and deprivation New evidence on the durability of social norms
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Internationalisation and innovation of firms: Give them one roof

Carlo Altomonte, Tommaso Aquilante, Gábor Békés, Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano 21 March 2014

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Policymakers traditionally have attempted to encourage internationalisation based on the implicit rationale that the latter is associated with productivity and/or employment growth. At the same time, since innovation is the key driver of productivity growth, much attention has been devoted to the specific channels through which trade and innovation are linked (see Aiginger 2011). However, in most European countries, as well as at the EU level, these policies are carried out through various, often unrelated agencies – as found by EIM (2010), a European report reviewing some 130 programmes.

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Topics:  Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  internationalisation, innovation, productivity growth

Offshoring and its effects on innovation in emerging economies

Ursula Fritsch, Holger Görg 23 September 2013

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Most empirical studies of the impact of outsourcing on firms look at industrialised countries. However, outsourcing is also common in emerging economies, and firms in middle-income countries split up their production processes similarly to firms in developed countries (see figures in Miroudot et al. (2009) on trade in intermediates). Recent research analyses the benefits to firms from outsourcing, focusing mainly on productivity and innovation effects. The latter are particularly important, since innovation is a key determinant of productivity improvements and – ultimately – growth.

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Topics:  International trade Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  R&D, offshoring, innovation, international trade, emerging markets, outsourcing, technology transfer

Creativity, cities and innovation

Neil Lee, Andrés Rodríguez-Pose 24 August 2013

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The creative industries are seen as an economically important source of innovation in many developed countries. Definitions vary, but the creative industries are normally seen as including both obviously ‘creative’ sectors, such as the arts, and more mundane activity like software or publishing. This diverse set of industries has seen significant growth in many countries (see UNCTAD 2010).

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Topics:  Productivity and Innovation

Tags:  innovation, creative industries

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