Toby Nangle, Matt Tickle, 20 April 2017

While defined benefit pension schemes are typically viewed as users rather than sources of sponsor-firm funds, the considerations taken into account when firms choose to scale contributions are such that they become indistinguishable from other firm financing decisions. This column analyses how pension scheme funding deficits arise and argues that whilst deficits do not exist by design, firms’ decision to fund or underfund a defined benefit scheme might usefully be examined as one of many competing sources of long-term finance.

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The Cambridge Endowment for Research in Finance (CERF) welcomes submissions for its 2016 Corporate Finance Theory Symposium to be held in Cambridge UK, Cambridge Judge Business School,  16-17 September 2016.

The symposium covers all areas of theoretical corporate finance, including theory papers that combine corporate finance theory with a related area such as banking, market micro-structure, asset pricing, and financial accounting.

We expect to have about 9 papers (each with a discussant) and one keynote speech. This year’s keynote speaker will be Anjan Thakor, John E. Simon Professor of Finance,Director of the PhD Programme, and Director of the WFA Center for Finance and Accounting Research.

Ross Levine, Chen Lin, Wensi Xie, 29 July 2015

Some have argued that the stock market serves as a ‘spare tire’ during banking crises by providing an alternative corporate financing channel. This column examines the claim using data for 36 countries spanning 20 years. The findings support the three core predictions of the spare tire view, suggesting that countries can insulate parts of their economy from future banking crises by designing appropriate legal frameworks.

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