Benjamin Faber, Thibault Fally, 02 August 2017

A recent literature has documented the impact of firm heterogeneity on workers’ earnings. This column assesses firm heterogeneity in the context of its impact on households’ cost of living. Rich and poor households source their consumption differently, and are therefore impacted differently by asymmetries in heterogeneous firms. An analysis suggests that moderate trade liberalisation could lead to a 1.5-2.5% lower cost-of-living inflation in retail consumption for the richest 20% of US households compared to the poorest 20%.

Antoine Berthou, Filippo di Mauro, 24 December 2015

The effect of exchange rate devaluations on a country’s exports is frequently debated, with some supporting a strong impact and others suggesting no sizeable response of exports to relative price changes. This column argues that firm heterogeneity in terms of productivity and size can explain the opposing views. The measured reaction of aggregate exports to relative price movements is largely determined by the reaction of the most productive/largest companies.

Atsuyuki Kato, 25 November 2014

A large literature shows the importance of firm heterogeneity in determining trade patterns. This column discusses policy implementation issues related to the ‘new new trade theory’. The nature of an export good – be it consumption or production oriented – influences the importance of firm productivity in the export decision. The relationship between productivity and markups also varies across industries; pro-export policies must take account of this, lest they exacerbate distortion.

Hylke Vandenbussche, Jozef Konings, 05 March 2008

The European Commission’s proposed anti-dumping reform (AD) has been dumped. This research suggests that is not always in the best interests of the industry that anti-dumping supposedly protects.

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