Angus Armstrong 14 June 2016

How does the current UK financial infrastructure contrast with how such infrastructure might look like post Brexit? In this video, Angus Armstrong (NIESR) focuses on the role of financial services. He noted that the UK has a systemically large domestic banking system (different from e.g. Luxembourg) so regulation plays differently. He highlighted the issue of the of emergency liquidity assistance provision. Unusually, Eurozone infrastructure extents to the EEA, which allows the UK to be centre of Euro wholesale finance. This video was recorded in June 2016 during the “Economics of the UK-EU Relationship” workshop at Brunel University London.

Nicholas Crafts 14 June 2016

The impact of EU membership on British growth performance both past and future is somewhat controversial. In this video, Nicholas Crafts (Warwick) gives his assessment of the evidence. He suggests that the UK’s entry into the EU in the 1970s had strong positive effects in particular because it addressed issues of weak competition but that Brexit now would lower the income level through adverse effects on trade without addressing any of the 21st-century supply-side problems that hold UK growth back. This video was recorded in June 2016 during the “Economics of the UK-EU Relationship” workshop at Brunel University London.

Liesel Filgueiras 13 June 2016

Mining companies have high economic growth. In this video, Liesel Filgueiras discusses the responsibility of mining companies for the development of local municipalities. Most of the revenues go directly to federal governments, leaving little benefits to the industry for local communities. Cross-sector and local government partnerships need to de developed to ensure the investment of the revenues to build public policies. This video was recorded during the International Growth Centre’s annual conference held in London in June 2016.

Paul Stevens 08 June 2016

In 2014, after more than a decade of a booming oil market, oil prices collapsed. In this video, Paul Stevens discusses the effects of the super cycle for oil-exporting countries. The higher oil prices destroyed demand, leading to over-supply and a fall in prices. As a consequence, oil-exporting countries had difficulties in meeting budget expenditures and needed to diversify their economies. This video was shot during the International Growth Centre’s annual conference held in London in June 2016.

Bruce Hansen 03 June 2016

If an economist selects the wrong model to study a question, the results are also likely to be wrong. In this video, Bruce Hansen talks to Soumaya Keynes about how model selection and combination can be used for forecasting with small error. Model combination methods are suited for forecasting and policy evaluation. This video was recorded in March 2016 during the Royal Economic Society’s Annual Conference held at the University of Sussex.

Are criminals lacking in moral motivation? In this video, Alexander Cappelen and Bertil Tungodden conduct an experiment in order to understand if prisoners differ from other people when it comes to sharing money. On average, prisoners share as much as others when confronted to the same situations. Their study has implications for the reintegration of criminals into society. This video was recorded at the Choice Lab, Norwegian School of Economics, in Bergen.

Haiqing Xu 01 June 2016

Econometrics is a big part of economics. In this video, Haiqing Xu presents his paper for which he won the 2014 Sargan Econometrics Prize. He presents a game theoretical model that can be used to analyse firms’ strategic behaviour and to study social interactions. This video was recorded in March 2016 during the Royal Economic Society’s Annual Conference held at the University of Sussex.

Pedro Gomes 30 May 2016

There are sometimes large wage disparities between the private and public sector. In this video, Pedro Gomes presents his research on how to set wages in the public sector. The study focuses on finding principles that can help policymakers design policies for public employment. This video was recorded in March 2016 during the Royal Economic Society’s Annual Conference held at the University of Sussex.

Christian Hansen 27 May 2016

Big data is changing economics and the way causal relationships are studied. In this video, Christian Hansen and Soumaya Keynes discuss the importance of big data for econometrics. Big data offers a lot of information and it is easier to draw policy lessons. It also gives more flexibility without forcing researchers to impose control variables, allowing more reliable conclusions to be obtained. This video was recorded in March 2016 during the Royal Economic Society’s Annual Conference held at the University of Sussex.

What happens in the brain when something is fair or unfair? In this video, Alexander Cappelen and Bertil Tungodden present their research on the effects of fairness on our brains. Using fMRI technology, the neuroeconomics study shows that the brain reacts to unfairness. Income inequalities are perceived as fair if they reflect different work contributions. This video was recorded at the Choice Lab, Norwegian School of Economics, in Bergen.

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