Blogs&Reviews

  • Anabel González discusses the recently announced negotiations for a bilateral trade agreement between the United States and Kenya, which would be the United States’ first such accord with a sub-Saharan country

  • Charles Wyplosz worries that the new European Commission five-year budget will offer no more than variations around the status quo

  • Chad Bown explains why the 'cascading protection' of the Trump administration's move to impose tariffs on even more steel and aluminium products is worrying.

  • Coffee table economics

    Diane Coyle, 03 February 2020

    Diane Coyle recommends Steven Medema’s  "The Economics Book: from Xenophon to Cryptocurrency, 250 Milestones in the History of Economics" for both the beautiful illustrations and its selection of concepts and capsule explanations.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Jon Danielsson, 02 January 2019

    After the financial markets finally closed at the end of the year, Jon Danielsson asks whether 2018 was as bad as the media would have it.

  • Oya Celasun, Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, Maurice Obstfeld, 24 December 2018

    The global economy started 2018 on a positive note but the momentum lost steam. In this post, Oya Celasun, Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, and Maurice Obstfeld explain the year in five charts. 

  • Jeffrey Frankel, 22 December 2018

    President George H.W. Bush was accused of breaking his own ‘no new taxes’ pledge. In this post, Jeffrey Frankel argues that Bush's mistake was making the anti-tax pledge in 1988 in the first place and sticking to it in the first part of his presidency. The 1990 reversal on fiscal policy set the stage for a decade of economic growth that eventually achieved budget surpluses.

  • Ansgar Belke, Daniel Gros, 21 December 2018

    The ending of the ECB's bond buying programme had no impact on interest rates. In this post, Ansgar Belke and Daniel Gros argue that this is because while the programme might have lowered rates when it was announced, the impact was only transitory. 

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 21 December 2018

    Simon Wren-Lewis discusses how the political divide that has become clear since the Brexit vote (and which is also clear in US support for Trump) is between towns and cities, not between regions.

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