Blogs&Reviews

  • A world with central bank digital currencies

    Tommaso Mancini-Griffoli, Maria Soledad Martinez Peria, Itai Agur, Anil Ari, John Kiff, Adina Popescu, Céline Rochon, Zoltan Jakab, 15 February 2019

    In this post, a group of IMF economists examine why central banks might consider issuing digitial currency, and how households and firms might adapt.

  • In this post, Ashoka Mody documents the costs of ECB timidity, which, he argues, arises from the political limits on its actions.

  • Hard Brexit ahead: Breaking the deadlock and restarting customs cooperation in Europe

    Gabriel Felbermayr, Clemens Fuest, Hans Gersbach, Albrecht Ritschl, Marcel Thum, Martin Braml, 07 February 2019

    The authors of this post argue that while the deadlock in the Brexit negotiations can be broken by tweaking the time limits of the Withdrawal Agreement and at the same time abandoning the backstop, a more viable long-term solution is a European Customs Association where Britain has active membership and a full vote alongside the EU member states.

  • A new expert survey on bank capital requirements

    Gene Ambrocio, Iftekhar Hasan, Esa Jokivuolle, Kim Ristolainen, 06 February 2019

    Capital requirements for banks have been raised considerably since the Global Crisis, but the optimal level and form of such requirements are still much debated. In this post, researchers from the Bank of Finland introduce a new survey of academic experts that will focus on the question of how much capital banks should hold.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Gabriel Felbermayr, Jens Südekum, 28 June 2018

    Whether economists like it or not, the world has to deal with President Trump’s interpretation of the US's trade deficit. In this post, Gabriel Felbermayr and Jens Suedekum look at the numbers behind the deficit and assess the bargaining position of the EU if the trade conflict were to escalate.

  • Jeffrey Frankel, 27 June 2018

    One sometimes hears that the tariffs imposed by the Trump administration are a complete departure from historical Republican orthodoxy. In this post, Jeffrey Frankel argues that while in recent decades Republican politicians have tended towards free-trade philosophy more than their Democratic counterparts, during most of the first 100 years of its existence, the Republican Party was protectionist in both word and deed. 

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 27 June 2018

    Last week saw leading lights in the Labour party attack elements of the mass movement of those who want to remain in the EU. In this post, Simon Wren-Lewis argues that picking a fight with some Remainers by suggesting they are, knowingly or not, just an anti-Corbyn front because they attack Labour on Brexit seems to both miss the point and to be terrible politics. He also argues that Labour have little to lose by backing the popular people’s vote against May’s deal as well as voting against that deal.

  • Diane Coyle, 25 June 2018

    In a revised edition of "Doing Capitalism in the Innovation Economy", William Janeway argues that our economic system – where complicated interactions between government, providers of finance, and capitalists drive technological innovation and economic growth – is inherently fragile. In this post, Diane Coyle welcomes the update as timely. Since the book’s original publication in 2012, the world has seen sluggish growth, flatlining productivity, and extraordinary changes in the economy and society brought about by technology.

  • Roger Farmer, 21 June 2018

    In this follow up to his post on ergodicity, Roger Farmer discusses chaos theory, 'spin glasses', and what it means to have rational expectations.

Pages

Vox eBooks

CEPR Policy Research