Blogs&Reviews

  • Competition policy and European firms’ competitiveness

    Massimo Motta, Martin Peitz, 20 February 2019

    Massimo Motta and Martin Peitz ask whether merger control obstructs or promotes European firms’ competitiveness, whether there is room for public policy considerations beyond competition policy goals when dealing with competition-related issues, and what can be done to promote the competitiveness of European firms both within and beyond Europe.

  • A world with central bank digital currencies

    Tommaso Mancini-Griffoli, Maria Soledad Martinez Peria, Itai Agur, Anil Ari, John Kiff, Adina Popescu, Céline Rochon, Zoltan Jakab, 15 February 2019

    In this post, a group of IMF economists examine why central banks might consider issuing digitial currency, and how households and firms might adapt.

  • In this post, Ashoka Mody documents the costs of ECB timidity, which, he argues, arises from the political limits on its actions.

  • Hard Brexit ahead: Breaking the deadlock and restarting customs cooperation in Europe

    Gabriel Felbermayr, Clemens Fuest, Hans Gersbach, Albrecht Ritschl, Marcel Thum, Martin Braml, 07 February 2019

    The authors of this post argue that while the deadlock in the Brexit negotiations can be broken by tweaking the time limits of the Withdrawal Agreement and at the same time abandoning the backstop, a more viable long-term solution is a European Customs Association where Britain has active membership and a full vote alongside the EU member states.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Roger Farmer, 21 June 2018

    In this follow up to his post on ergodicity, Roger Farmer discusses chaos theory, 'spin glasses', and what it means to have rational expectations.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 20 June 2018

    The Brexit debate was not the first time that the broadcast media in the UK reinforced rather than countered the claims of the right-wing press – the same happened with austerity. In this post, Simon Wren-Lewis asks why the BBC and other broadcasters largely ignored standard textbook macroeconomics, and instead promoted ‘mediamacro’.

  • Chad Bown, Euijin Jung, Zhiyao (Lucy) Lu, 19 June 2018

    On 15 June, the Trump administration produced the list of specific Chinese products on which it soon plans to impose tariffs. In this post, Chad Bown, Euijin Jung and Zhiyao Lu examine this list and China's proposed retaliation, and argue that even companies that are not suffering yet from China’s mistreatment will soon be hurting because of tariff-induced higher costs.

  • Jonathan Portes, 19 June 2018

    A 2018 Equality and Human Rights Commission report predicts a dramatic rise in child poverty. Jonathan Portes, a co-authorof the report, challenges Christopher Snowdon, a scepticof such gloomy predictions, to a bet to see who is right.

  • Michele Ruta, 18 June 2018

    China’s Belt and Road Initiative is an ambitious effort to improve connectivity on a trans-continental scale through infrastructure investment and regional cooperation. The initiative has the potential to accelerate the rate of economic integration and development, as trade costs decline. But, like any large undertaking, there are significant policy and economic challenges. In this post, Michele Ruta describes key opportunities and risks of the initiative. 

Pages

Vox eBooks

CEPR Policy Research