Blogs&Reviews

  • The destination-based cash flow tax: A negative-revenue tax?

    David Laborde, William Martin, 17 April 2019

    David Laborde and Will Martin identify serious problems with the proposal to combine features of a VAT and a wage subsidy, especially for countries where the direct government revenue implications are strongly negative.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis asks why pundits failed to see how far right the Conservatives were moving under Cameron, and the subsequent rise of Corbyn in 2015 and Labour’s gains during the 2017 campaign.

  • No ordinary woman

    Diane Coyle, 08 April 2019

    Diane Coyle reviews a biography of Edith Penrose written by her daughter-in-law, Angela Penrose.

  • Francis Fukuyama against mainstream economics

    Branko Milanovic, 01 April 2019

    Branko Milanovic highlights a number of views on economics from Francis Fukuyama’s "The origins of political order", many directly critical of some mainstream nostrums.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Jeffrey Frankel, 27 June 2018

    One sometimes hears that the tariffs imposed by the Trump administration are a complete departure from historical Republican orthodoxy. In this post, Jeffrey Frankel argues that while in recent decades Republican politicians have tended towards free-trade philosophy more than their Democratic counterparts, during most of the first 100 years of its existence, the Republican Party was protectionist in both word and deed. 

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 27 June 2018

    Last week saw leading lights in the Labour party attack elements of the mass movement of those who want to remain in the EU. In this post, Simon Wren-Lewis argues that picking a fight with some Remainers by suggesting they are, knowingly or not, just an anti-Corbyn front because they attack Labour on Brexit seems to both miss the point and to be terrible politics. He also argues that Labour have little to lose by backing the popular people’s vote against May’s deal as well as voting against that deal.

  • Diane Coyle, 25 June 2018

    In a revised edition of "Doing Capitalism in the Innovation Economy", William Janeway argues that our economic system – where complicated interactions between government, providers of finance, and capitalists drive technological innovation and economic growth – is inherently fragile. In this post, Diane Coyle welcomes the update as timely. Since the book’s original publication in 2012, the world has seen sluggish growth, flatlining productivity, and extraordinary changes in the economy and society brought about by technology.

  • Roger Farmer, 21 June 2018

    In this follow up to his post on ergodicity, Roger Farmer discusses chaos theory, 'spin glasses', and what it means to have rational expectations.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 20 June 2018

    The Brexit debate was not the first time that the broadcast media in the UK reinforced rather than countered the claims of the right-wing press – the same happened with austerity. In this post, Simon Wren-Lewis asks why the BBC and other broadcasters largely ignored standard textbook macroeconomics, and instead promoted ‘mediamacro’.

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