Blogs&Reviews

  • The destination-based cash flow tax: A negative-revenue tax?

    David Laborde, William Martin, 17 April 2019

    David Laborde and Will Martin identify serious problems with the proposal to combine features of a VAT and a wage subsidy, especially for countries where the direct government revenue implications are strongly negative.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis asks why pundits failed to see how far right the Conservatives were moving under Cameron, and the subsequent rise of Corbyn in 2015 and Labour’s gains during the 2017 campaign.

  • No ordinary woman

    Diane Coyle, 08 April 2019

    Diane Coyle reviews a biography of Edith Penrose written by her daughter-in-law, Angela Penrose.

  • Francis Fukuyama against mainstream economics

    Branko Milanovic, 01 April 2019

    Branko Milanovic highlights a number of views on economics from Francis Fukuyama’s "The origins of political order", many directly critical of some mainstream nostrums.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Antonio Fatás, 16 June 2018

    GDP growth rates can be a  misleading indicator of the true performance of different economies. In this post, Antonio Fatas argues that once the effect of an ageing population is removed, Japan has actually performed very well since 1990, while Italy stands out among the largest advanced economies because its performance along all dimensions has been poor since the 1990s.

  • Karl Whelan, 14 June 2018

    The past week has been the most fraught yet in the Brexit negotiations, with the ‘Irish backstop’ a key issue. In this post, Karl Whelan argues that rather than being threatened economically, Northern Ireland would gain from the implementation of the EU’s backstop.

  • Ashoka Mody, 14 June 2018

    Italian financial tremors are again rumbling dangerously. In this post, Ashoka Mody describes how tremors from the Italian fault line are set to spread in cascading earthquakes through euro area and global financial systems.

  • Roger Farmer, 13 June 2018

    In the New Keynesian model, the connection between the unemployment rate and the inflation rate is driven by the Phillips curve. In this post, Roger Farmer proposes replacing the Phillips curve with a belief function, an alternative theory of the connection between unemployment and inflation that better explains the facts.

  • Livio Stracca, 13 June 2018

    Knowledge of central banks is limited among households, who are also often found to have beliefs that are inconsistent with the foundations of the models underpinning modern monetary policy, such as the fact that higher interest rates lead to lower inflation. In this post, Livio Stracca describes the implications of this fact and summarises a new book that tries to popularise modern central banking for a wider audience.

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