Blogs&Reviews

  • Competition policy and European firms’ competitiveness

    Massimo Motta, Martin Peitz, 20 February 2019

    Massimo Motta and Martin Peitz ask whether merger control obstructs or promotes European firms’ competitiveness, whether there is room for public policy considerations beyond competition policy goals when dealing with competition-related issues, and what can be done to promote the competitiveness of European firms both within and beyond Europe.

  • A world with central bank digital currencies

    Tommaso Mancini-Griffoli, Maria Soledad Martinez Peria, Itai Agur, Anil Ari, John Kiff, Adina Popescu, Céline Rochon, Zoltan Jakab, 15 February 2019

    In this post, a group of IMF economists examine why central banks might consider issuing digitial currency, and how households and firms might adapt.

  • In this post, Ashoka Mody documents the costs of ECB timidity, which, he argues, arises from the political limits on its actions.

  • Hard Brexit ahead: Breaking the deadlock and restarting customs cooperation in Europe

    Gabriel Felbermayr, Clemens Fuest, Hans Gersbach, Albrecht Ritschl, Marcel Thum, Martin Braml, 07 February 2019

    The authors of this post argue that while the deadlock in the Brexit negotiations can be broken by tweaking the time limits of the Withdrawal Agreement and at the same time abandoning the backstop, a more viable long-term solution is a European Customs Association where Britain has active membership and a full vote alongside the EU member states.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Thorsten Beck, 29 May 2018

    The main tension between London and Brussels seems to stem from a fundamentally different approach: for the UK government, Brexit is a political process; for the European Commission, a legal-administrative process. Thorsten Beck reviews the current situation and concludes that the political class in the UK has failed its population.

  • Roger Farmer, 29 May 2018

    So-called experts make predictions about prospects for UK after Brexit as if we can plan for the future using known statistical probabilities, but no one knows what the consequences will be relative to staying in the EU in 15 years’ time. The one thing that will get us into trouble, though, is being ‘sure’ about predictions that might be plain wrong.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 28 May 2018

    Voters for 'Leave' wanted a Brexit that delivered more money for public services, but that cannot be realised under any of the four possible Brexit scenarios on the table. Economics matters to voters, more so than issues of sovereignty or immigration, and this post argues that Leave voters were misled with mythical economic gains.

  • Jon Danielsson, 20 May 2018

    Two widely used indicators of financial risk, the VIX index and the ECB’s CISS, are at a historical low. As this post explains, however, provided we only worry about the immediate future, and then only care to measure the easily visible, our favourite risk indicators will tell us everything is fine even if the longer-term political uncertainty appears high.

  • Jeffrey Frankel, 19 May 2018

    President Trump and China are exchanging threats of raising tariffs which, if implemented, would signal the start of a trade war. There are some who defend Trump’s actions as bargaining tactics, but in this post I lay out seven reasons why China is unlikely to back down in this case, and why the US will not win this war.

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