Blogs&Reviews

  • The destination-based cash flow tax: A negative-revenue tax?

    David Laborde, William Martin, 18 April 2019

    David Laborde and Will Martin identify serious problems with the proposal to combine features of a VAT and a wage subsidy, especially for countries where the direct government revenue implications are strongly negative.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis asks why pundits failed to see how far right the Conservatives were moving under Cameron, and the subsequent rise of Corbyn in 2015 and Labour’s gains during the 2017 campaign.

  • No ordinary woman

    Diane Coyle, 09 April 2019

    Diane Coyle reviews a biography of Edith Penrose written by her daughter-in-law, Angela Penrose.

  • Francis Fukuyama against mainstream economics

    Branko Milanovic, 02 April 2019

    Branko Milanovic highlights a number of views on economics from Francis Fukuyama’s "The origins of political order", many directly critical of some mainstream nostrums.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Livio Stracca, 13 June 2018

    Knowledge of central banks is limited among households, who are also often found to have beliefs that are inconsistent with the foundations of the models underpinning modern monetary policy, such as the fact that higher interest rates lead to lower inflation. In this post, Livio Stracca describes the implications of this fact and summarises a new book that tries to popularise modern central banking for a wider audience.

  • Jeffrey Frankel, 12 June 2018

    Not long after having said that the China trade war was “on hold”, the Trump administration flipped the switch back to “on”. In this post, Jeffrey Frankel analyses Trump’s actions and asks whether his approach to trade can be explained.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 12 June 2018

    In the wake of the ‘Windrush generation’ row, Simon Wren-Lewis argues that the 2010 UK coalition government’s focus on immigration with the ‘tens of thousands’ target was a deceit because most of the government had no intention of achieving that target. Part of the facade of trying to hit that target was the hostile environment policy.

  • Nikolaus Wolf, 11 June 2018

    With protectionism back on the political agenda, the European Review of Economic History has published a selection of papers demonstrating how trade and welfare policies have always been related. As Nikolaus Wolf discusses in this post, the papers also show that while the wider economic benefits from protectionism are uncertain at best, 100 years ago domestic policy considerations were already often trumping international cooperation.

  • Jonathan Portes, 09 June 2018

    There are discrepancies between population and migrations statistics for the UK, for both EU and non-EU nationals. As Jonathan Portes outlines in this post, it seems reasonably clear that in the recent past EU migration has been significantly higher, and non-EU migration significantly lower, than previously thought, and that, perhaps as a consequence of the government’s determination to reduce non-EU migration, the UK may have become even more dependent on EU migration.  

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