Blogs&Reviews

  • Olivier in Wonderland

    Charles Wyplosz, 17 June 2019

    The AEA presidential lecture by Olivier Blanchard has become an instant success. In this blog, Charles Wyplosz flags some caveats to bear in mind when interpreting his lecture.

  • Brexit: What’s next?

    Pascal Lamy, 14 June 2019

    In this blog based on a speech at the House of Commons in April 2019, Pascal Lamy argues that there has been a fundamental misunderstanding in the UK of the political and economic trade-off that Brexit implies. 

  • Fredrik NG Andersson and Lars Jonung argue that the current push for fiscal activism is short-sighted. Instead, the Swedish case from the last 25 years shows that stable public finances combined with supply-side policies is the recipe for economic stability and growth.

  • How serious politics must counter populism

    Clemens Fuest, 04 June 2019

    Clemens Fuest argues that moderate politicians should compete with populists by offering realistic perspectives, with Emmanuel Macron serving as a role model in this regard.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Jon Danielsson, 01 June 2018

    The excessive build-up of risk before 2007 was missed in spite of all the numbers being in front of us. Jon Danielsson explains how financial policymakers have fallen for the 'McNamara fallacy' in many aspects by solely relying on what can be measured and quantified, preferring to regulate by models and focusing on perceived risk and not actual risk.

  • Thorsten Beck, 01 June 2018

    The recent eBook, "Ordoliberalism: A German oddity?", was presented in Washington DC and Vienna. This post summarises the discussion concerning the divergence between practice in theory when it comes to bank bailouts and ordoliberalism.

  • Diane Coyle, 31 May 2018

    This review of Benn Steil’s new book on the Marshall Plan looks at the beginning of the Cold War from the vantage of post-Brexit Britain, and outlines how Steil sheds new insights on many of the players in the debate over the Marshall Plan’s adoption.

  • Jonathan Dingel, 31 May 2018

    Inferring tradability is hard. In this post, Jonathan Dingel reviews papers that explore predictions of tradable and non-tradable industries and activities.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 30 May 2018

    Macroeconomics gave up on trying to explain recent macroeconomic history, or, why the economy did what it did over the last 30 or 40 years. In this post, Simon Wren-Lewis argues that it is time that macroeconomics revisited the decisions it made around 1980, and realise that the deficiencies with traditional time series analysis were not as great as they were made out to be.

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