Blogs&Reviews

  • The destination-based cash flow tax: A negative-revenue tax?

    David Laborde, William Martin, 17 April 2019

    David Laborde and Will Martin identify serious problems with the proposal to combine features of a VAT and a wage subsidy, especially for countries where the direct government revenue implications are strongly negative.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis asks why pundits failed to see how far right the Conservatives were moving under Cameron, and the subsequent rise of Corbyn in 2015 and Labour’s gains during the 2017 campaign.

  • No ordinary woman

    Diane Coyle, 08 April 2019

    Diane Coyle reviews a biography of Edith Penrose written by her daughter-in-law, Angela Penrose.

  • Francis Fukuyama against mainstream economics

    Branko Milanovic, 01 April 2019

    Branko Milanovic highlights a number of views on economics from Francis Fukuyama’s "The origins of political order", many directly critical of some mainstream nostrums.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Thorsten Beck, 12 April 2018

    My CEPR Discussion Paper, “The economics of supranational bank supervision” was just published. It is the latest installment in a series of papers on the tension between national bank supervision and cross-border banking. This post summarises the main empirical findings that illustrate how international supervisory cooperation is related to economic links. 

  • Jon Danielsson, 12 April 2018

    The financial press had a field day when volatility hit a high in early February. In this post I argue that it was not all that extreme. The high point of volatility was only the 103th highest volatility in the past 88 years. 

  • Roger Farmer, 11 April 2018

    This post accesses the little-hyped concept of ergodicity.  In an exploration of economic forecasts, I argue that ergodicity must be injected into probability models.  From that ensues trips into the butterfly effect, multiple equilibria, and the representative agent approach.

  • Thomas Sampson, 10 April 2018

    In this post I examine a recent policy paper from the UK government that looks at trade in a post-Brexit EU and lay out several issues in need of consideration.

  • Ashoka Mody, 01 April 2018

    Financial markets are better than economists in sensing non-linearities, the critical junctures where fundamental shifts occur. This article argues that politics, economics, and finance are threatening to shake things up; it’s no time to look away.

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