Blogs&Reviews

  • Landmark court decision limits presidential trade restrictions

    Steve Charnovitz, Gary Hufbauer, 28 July 2020

    The U.S. Court of International Trade’s landmark decision voiding President Trump's tariffs on steel from Turkey opens the door to future challenges of US trade actions based on equal protection grounds

  • A Hamiltonian glimpse in Europe

    Thorsten Beck, 27 July 2020

    Thorsten Beck believes that while the compromise reached on the European recovery support will not be enough to overcome the COVID-19 challenges in the EU, it is an important first step.

  • Joshua Meltzer argues that the Trump administration has failed to provide a coherent vision for maintaining and expanding US competitiveness in the 21st century, including through its trade policy.

  • Is the EU ready to truly apply the subsidiarity principle?

    Roel Beetsma, George Kopits, 15 June 2020

    Roel Beetsma and George Kopits argue there is a strong legal and economic case for a timely application of the subsidiarity principle in establishing a permanent EU-wide countercyclical facility.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Nicolas Véron, 02 July 2018

    In August 2010, Andreas Georgiou, former President of the Hellenic Statistical Authority, was charged with having harmed Greece's national interests. In this post, Nicolas Veron argues that the relentless prosecutions against Georgiou are more than a matter of shameful harassment by Greece – his case also raises disturbing questions about the integrity of European statistical processes.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 29 June 2018

    Many businesses in the UK have finally decided to make their concerns over Brexit public. In this post, Simon Wren-Lewis argues that the prospect of a regulation-free post-Brexit UK has little appeal to businesses that trade because what these business want is harmonised regulations - which is essentially what the EU does. 

  • Gabriel Felbermayr, Jens Südekum, 28 June 2018

    Whether economists like it or not, the world has to deal with President Trump’s interpretation of the US's trade deficit. In this post, Gabriel Felbermayr and Jens Suedekum look at the numbers behind the deficit and assess the bargaining position of the EU if the trade conflict were to escalate.

  • Jeffrey Frankel, 27 June 2018

    One sometimes hears that the tariffs imposed by the Trump administration are a complete departure from historical Republican orthodoxy. In this post, Jeffrey Frankel argues that while in recent decades Republican politicians have tended towards free-trade philosophy more than their Democratic counterparts, during most of the first 100 years of its existence, the Republican Party was protectionist in both word and deed. 

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 27 June 2018

    Last week saw leading lights in the Labour party attack elements of the mass movement of those who want to remain in the EU. In this post, Simon Wren-Lewis argues that picking a fight with some Remainers by suggesting they are, knowingly or not, just an anti-Corbyn front because they attack Labour on Brexit seems to both miss the point and to be terrible politics. He also argues that Labour have little to lose by backing the popular people’s vote against May’s deal as well as voting against that deal.

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