Blogs&Reviews

  • In this follow up to his post on ergodicity, Roger Farmer discusses chaos theory, 'spin glasses', and what it means to have rational expectations.

  • How the broadcast media created mediamacro

    Simon Wren-Lewis, 20 June 2018

    The Brexit debate was not the first time that the broadcast media in the UK reinforced rather than countered the claims of the right-wing press – the same happened with austerity. In this post, Simon Wren-Lewis asks why the BBC and other broadcasters largely ignored standard textbook macroeconomics, and instead promoted ‘mediamacro’.

  • Trump, China, and tariffs: From soybeans to semiconductors

    Chad Bown, Euijin Jung, Zhiyao (Lucy) Lu, 19 June 2018

    On 15 June, the Trump administration produced the list of specific Chinese products on which it soon plans to impose tariffs. In this post, Chad Bown, Euijin Jung and Zhiyao Lu examine this list and China's proposed retaliation, and argue that even companies that are not suffering yet from China’s mistreatment will soon be hurting because of tariff-induced higher costs.

  • A 2018 Equality and Human Rights Commission report predicts a dramatic rise in child poverty. Jonathan Portes, a co-authorof the report, challenges Christopher Snowdon, a scepticof such gloomy predictions, to a bet to see who is right.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Jon Danielsson, 01 June 2018

    Are cryptocurrencies the future of money, Ponzi schemes, speculators dream, freedom or just a cult?

  • Thorsten Beck, 01 June 2018

    The recent eBook, "Ordoliberalism: A German oddity?", was presented in Washington DC and Vienna. This post summarises the discussion concerning the divergence between practice in theory when it comes to bank bailouts and ordoliberalism.

  • Jon Danielsson, 01 June 2018

    The excessive build-up of risk before 2007 was missed in spite of all the numbers being in front of us. Jon Danielsson explains how financial policymakers have fallen for the 'McNamara fallacy' in many aspects by solely relying on what can be measured and quantified, preferring to regulate by models and focusing on perceived risk and not actual risk.

  • Diane Coyle, 31 May 2018

    This review of Benn Steil’s new book on the Marshall Plan looks at the beginning of the Cold War from the vantage of post-Brexit Britain, and outlines how Steil sheds new insights on many of the players in the debate over the Marshall Plan’s adoption.

  • Jonathan Dingel, 31 May 2018

    Inferring tradability is hard. In this post, Jonathan Dingel reviews papers that explore predictions of tradable and non-tradable industries and activities.

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