Blogs&Reviews

  • The antitrust orthodoxy is blind to real data harms

    Cristina Caffarra, Gregory Crawford, Johnny Ryan, 22 April 2021

    Cristina Caffarra, Gregory Crawford and Johnny Ryan make the case that (lack of) privacy is an (often unobservable) price of using digital platforms, and that (lack of) privacy facilitates mainstream antitrust harms such as exploitation and foreclosure by dominant digital platforms.

  • Rebellion, Rascals, and Revenue: A review

    Shafik Hebous, 07 April 2021

    Shafik Hebous admires how Michael Keen and Joel Slemrod draw out common threads of tax principles and practice that have underlain tax systems for thousands of years to show us why polices were chosen, and why they failed or prevailed.

  • Democracy in Iceland

    Thorvaldur Gylfason, 31 March 2021

    Thorvaldur Gylfason argues that unless Iceland's Parliament confronts the country's oligarchs and respects the will of the people by ratifying the new constitution designed to reverse the retreat of age-old democracy, it risks becoming a failed state.

  • Government spending: Less may be more!

    Roel Beetsma, Ludger Schuknecht, 25 March 2021

    Roel Beetsma and Ludger Schuknecht argue that governments could and should deliver more for their citizens’ money.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 05 July 2018

    The EU have said that the deal offered to Northern Ireland (staying in the Single Market for goods without freedom of movement) is not available to the UK as a whole, a position that the UK has not tried to test in its negotiations. In this post, Simon Wren-Lewis argues that Theresa May should stop appeasing the Brexiters and formally make the proposal to the EU of extending the Northern Ireland deal to the rest of the UK.

  • Olivier Blanchard, Jacob Kirkegaard, 04 July 2018

    A coherent reform of asylum-based EU immigration must embody two main components: control over external borders and a new set of internal EU rules. EU leaders have made some progress on the first part, but the outlook concerning the second remains vague. In this post, Olivier Blanchard and Jacob Funk Kirkegaard make some suggestions for the way forward.

  • Roger Farmer, 04 July 2018

    In December 2017, Tristan Hanson and Eric Lonergan made the case for a UK sovereign wealth fund. In this post, Roger Farmer, who has long argued for the establishment of such a fund as part of an active financial stabilisation policy, reviews the proposal by Hanson and Lonergan, highlighting key aspects over which he agrees and differs.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 03 July 2018

    Monetary policy generally focuses on stabilising the business cycle, but that stabilisation has no impact on the medium-term level of output and productivity. Rather than focusing on inflation, in this post Simon Wren-Lewis argues for a new monetary policy mandate emphasising output. Making clear that inflation is a medium-term concern will make it easier for central banks to see through temporary shocks to inflation.

  • Jon Danielsson, 03 July 2018

    Risk models are easy targets for criticism, given their poor accuracy. So what are they good for? In this post, Jon Danielsson discusses four categories of risk model and how they might be used in real-world applications. 

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