Blogs&Reviews

  • The Trade and Cooperation Agreement signed between the European Union and the United Kingdom goes against six decades of UK efforts to avoid being economically disadvantaged in Europe. Tracking the evolution of the EU-UK relationship over the last 60 years can help in understanding this.

  • Self-fulfilling prophecies, quasi-non-ergodicity and wealth inequality

    Jean-Philippe Bouchaud, Roger Farmer, 13 January 2021

    Jean-Philippe Bouchaud and Roger Farmer argue that the vast inequalities we see in the world distribution of wealth are deeply connected to a somewhat esoteric concept from the theory of stochastic processes. 

  • Richard Baldwin hopes that the Covid-19 pandemic will foster a spirit of global solidarity and cohesion, a sense of shared humanity and common imperative.

  • Why the anti-appers?

    Michael Kende, 04 December 2020

    Michael Kende argues that the lack of digital trust in contact tracing apps which could help control the pandemic, save lives, and normalise our societies is a major wake-up call. 

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Jeffrey Frankel, 12 June 2018

    Not long after having said that the China trade war was “on hold”, the Trump administration flipped the switch back to “on”. In this post, Jeffrey Frankel analyses Trump’s actions and asks whether his approach to trade can be explained.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 12 June 2018

    In the wake of the ‘Windrush generation’ row, Simon Wren-Lewis argues that the 2010 UK coalition government’s focus on immigration with the ‘tens of thousands’ target was a deceit because most of the government had no intention of achieving that target. Part of the facade of trying to hit that target was the hostile environment policy.

  • Nikolaus Wolf, 11 June 2018

    With protectionism back on the political agenda, the European Review of Economic History has published a selection of papers demonstrating how trade and welfare policies have always been related. As Nikolaus Wolf discusses in this post, the papers also show that while the wider economic benefits from protectionism are uncertain at best, 100 years ago domestic policy considerations were already often trumping international cooperation.

  • Jonathan Portes, 09 June 2018

    There are discrepancies between population and migrations statistics for the UK, for both EU and non-EU nationals. As Jonathan Portes outlines in this post, it seems reasonably clear that in the recent past EU migration has been significantly higher, and non-EU migration significantly lower, than previously thought, and that, perhaps as a consequence of the government’s determination to reduce non-EU migration, the UK may have become even more dependent on EU migration.  

  • Jason Furman, Wilson Powell, 08 June 2018

    The fraction of Americans employed fell between 2007 and 2017, during which time employment rates rose in many other advanced economies despite these countries also facing a similar headwind of an ageing population. In this post, Jason Furman and Wilson Powell show how the biggest driver of this was employment among women, which stagnated in the US while increasing in most of the other advanced economies.

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