Blogs&Reviews

  • Eduardo Levy Yeyati argues that a countercyclical liquidity fund could complete the financial architecture not only by providing much needed lending of last resort during systemic crises, but also as a way to attract less unstable private capital to emerging economies.

  • Landmark court decision limits presidential trade restrictions

    Steve Charnovitz, Gary Hufbauer, 28 July 2020

    The U.S. Court of International Trade’s landmark decision voiding President Trump's tariffs on steel from Turkey opens the door to future challenges of US trade actions based on equal protection grounds

  • A Hamiltonian glimpse in Europe

    Thorsten Beck, 27 July 2020

    Thorsten Beck believes that while the compromise reached on the European recovery support will not be enough to overcome the COVID-19 challenges in the EU, it is an important first step.

  • Joshua Meltzer argues that the Trump administration has failed to provide a coherent vision for maintaining and expanding US competitiveness in the 21st century, including through its trade policy.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 03 June 2018

    With unemployment remaining high in the euro area and core inflation well below target, Simon Wren-Lewis argues that German fiscal policy, in particular, is too tight, calling for stimulus in the form of public investment.

  • Jon Danielsson, 01 June 2018

    Are cryptocurrencies the future of money, Ponzi schemes, speculators dream, freedom or just a cult?

  • Thorsten Beck, 01 June 2018

    The recent eBook, "Ordoliberalism: A German oddity?", was presented in Washington DC and Vienna. This post summarises the discussion concerning the divergence between practice in theory when it comes to bank bailouts and ordoliberalism.

  • Jon Danielsson, 01 June 2018

    The excessive build-up of risk before 2007 was missed in spite of all the numbers being in front of us. Jon Danielsson explains how financial policymakers have fallen for the 'McNamara fallacy' in many aspects by solely relying on what can be measured and quantified, preferring to regulate by models and focusing on perceived risk and not actual risk.

  • Diane Coyle, 31 May 2018

    This review of Benn Steil’s new book on the Marshall Plan looks at the beginning of the Cold War from the vantage of post-Brexit Britain, and outlines how Steil sheds new insights on many of the players in the debate over the Marshall Plan’s adoption.

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