Blogs&Reviews

  • Landmark court decision limits presidential trade restrictions

    Steve Charnovitz, Gary Hufbauer, 28 July 2020

    The U.S. Court of International Trade’s landmark decision voiding President Trump's tariffs on steel from Turkey opens the door to future challenges of US trade actions based on equal protection grounds

  • A Hamiltonian glimpse in Europe

    Thorsten Beck, 27 July 2020

    Thorsten Beck believes that while the compromise reached on the European recovery support will not be enough to overcome the COVID-19 challenges in the EU, it is an important first step.

  • Joshua Meltzer argues that the Trump administration has failed to provide a coherent vision for maintaining and expanding US competitiveness in the 21st century, including through its trade policy.

  • Is the EU ready to truly apply the subsidiarity principle?

    Roel Beetsma, George Kopits, 15 June 2020

    Roel Beetsma and George Kopits argue there is a strong legal and economic case for a timely application of the subsidiarity principle in establishing a permanent EU-wide countercyclical facility.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 30 May 2018

    Macroeconomics gave up on trying to explain recent macroeconomic history, or, why the economy did what it did over the last 30 or 40 years. In this post, Simon Wren-Lewis argues that it is time that macroeconomics revisited the decisions it made around 1980, and realise that the deficiencies with traditional time series analysis were not as great as they were made out to be.

  • Jon Danielsson, 30 May 2018

    Volatility is only a good measure of risk when shocks are distributed normally. This post argues that extreme value theory offers a better, if imperfect alternative. Even better would be to use more fundamental analysis.  

  • Thorsten Beck, 29 May 2018

    The main tension between London and Brussels seems to stem from a fundamentally different approach: for the UK government, Brexit is a political process; for the European Commission, a legal-administrative process. Thorsten Beck reviews the current situation and concludes that the political class in the UK has failed its population.

  • Roger Farmer, 29 May 2018

    So-called experts make predictions about prospects for UK after Brexit as if we can plan for the future using known statistical probabilities, but no one knows what the consequences will be relative to staying in the EU in 15 years’ time. The one thing that will get us into trouble, though, is being ‘sure’ about predictions that might be plain wrong.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 28 May 2018

    Voters for 'Leave' wanted a Brexit that delivered more money for public services, but that cannot be realised under any of the four possible Brexit scenarios on the table. Economics matters to voters, more so than issues of sovereignty or immigration, and this post argues that Leave voters were misled with mythical economic gains.

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