Blogs&Reviews

  • Rebellion, Rascals, and Revenue: A review

    Shafik Hebous, 07 April 2021

    Shafik Hebous admires how Michael Keen and Joel Slemrod draw out common threads of tax principles and practice that have underlain tax systems for thousands of years to show us why polices were chosen, and why they failed or prevailed.

  • Democracy in Iceland

    Thorvaldur Gylfason, 31 March 2021

    Thorvaldur Gylfason argues that unless Iceland's Parliament confronts the country's oligarchs and respects the will of the people by ratifying the new constitution designed to reverse the retreat of age-old democracy, it risks becoming a failed state.

  • Government spending: Less may be more!

    Roel Beetsma, Ludger Schuknecht, 25 March 2021

    Roel Beetsma and Ludger Schuknecht argue that governments could and should deliver more for their citizens’ money.

  • Twitter is free to ban users

    Jan Bouwens, 22 February 2021

    Jan Bouwens discusses the decision by Twitter and other social media platforms to ban President Trump and members of his campaign, and the objections to the bans raised by politicians.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Nikolaus Wolf, 11 June 2018

    With protectionism back on the political agenda, the European Review of Economic History has published a selection of papers demonstrating how trade and welfare policies have always been related. As Nikolaus Wolf discusses in this post, the papers also show that while the wider economic benefits from protectionism are uncertain at best, 100 years ago domestic policy considerations were already often trumping international cooperation.

  • Jonathan Portes, 09 June 2018

    There are discrepancies between population and migrations statistics for the UK, for both EU and non-EU nationals. As Jonathan Portes outlines in this post, it seems reasonably clear that in the recent past EU migration has been significantly higher, and non-EU migration significantly lower, than previously thought, and that, perhaps as a consequence of the government’s determination to reduce non-EU migration, the UK may have become even more dependent on EU migration.  

  • Ashoka Mody, 08 June 2018

    Social democracy bears a dual promise: domestic social justice and European unity. Reviewing Germany’s Social Democratic Party (SPD) and its post-WWII struggles, Ashoka Mody illustrates the difficulty in translating social democratic values into political practice. Unable to generate a domestic consensus and powerless to counter the priorities dictated by the euro, social democracy will continue to fail at home while divisions among EU nations deepen.

  • Jason Furman, Wilson Powell, 08 June 2018

    The fraction of Americans employed fell between 2007 and 2017, during which time employment rates rose in many other advanced economies despite these countries also facing a similar headwind of an ageing population. In this post, Jason Furman and Wilson Powell show how the biggest driver of this was employment among women, which stagnated in the US while increasing in most of the other advanced economies.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 07 June 2018

    Brexiters have come up with various reasons for not staying in the Customs Union. In this post, Simon Wren-Lewis argues that none of these reasons stands up to scrutiny. He also argues that Prime Minister Theresa May should have realised right away that the Brexit people voted for – taking back control and being at least no worse off in economic terms at the same time – was an impossible project, and that this realisation should have governed how she approached Brexit from the start. 

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