Blogs&Reviews

  • Rebellion, Rascals, and Revenue: A review

    Shafik Hebous, 07 April 2021

    Shafik Hebous admires how Michael Keen and Joel Slemrod draw out common threads of tax principles and practice that have underlain tax systems for thousands of years to show us why polices were chosen, and why they failed or prevailed.

  • Democracy in Iceland

    Thorvaldur Gylfason, 31 March 2021

    Thorvaldur Gylfason argues that unless Iceland's Parliament confronts the country's oligarchs and respects the will of the people by ratifying the new constitution designed to reverse the retreat of age-old democracy, it risks becoming a failed state.

  • Government spending: Less may be more!

    Roel Beetsma, Ludger Schuknecht, 25 March 2021

    Roel Beetsma and Ludger Schuknecht argue that governments could and should deliver more for their citizens’ money.

  • Twitter is free to ban users

    Jan Bouwens, 22 February 2021

    Jan Bouwens discusses the decision by Twitter and other social media platforms to ban President Trump and members of his campaign, and the objections to the bans raised by politicians.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Roger Farmer, 07 June 2018

    That idea that, in the immortal words of Gordon Gekko, “greed is good” is encapsulated in the first welfare theorem of economics which explains why markets, most of the time, work well. Selfish behaviour by people seeking to improve their own lives will, inevitably, improve the lives of everyone else on the planet.  In this post, Roger Farmer asks why that idea doesn’t apply also to the financial markets.

  • Pascal Lamy, 06 June 2018

    Although recent developments have challenged the established liberal consensus on globalisation, in this post Pascal Lamy argues that this process is set to continue due to the technological forces underpinning its evolution. While there is rising political opposition in light of increased inequality, undoing the current levels of economic integration will not be easy and strictly national solutions will be insufficient. In this context, Europe needs to unite around its social market model and project its values more strongly in the world.

  • Ben Clift, 05 June 2018

    Debate on euro area reform has been split between two camps: those who saw the euro area crisis as a consequence of moral hazard, and those who saw the threat of contagion effects through vulnerable financial markets. In this post, Ben Clift details how ECB Governor Mario Draghi’s recent speech proposing a full realisation of the banking union, with risk sharing and public backstops to prevent ‘bad equilibrium’, signals that the ECB’s vision for euro area reform has finally shifted to the latter, in line with the IMF’s vision for euro area architecture reform. 

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 03 June 2018

    With unemployment remaining high in the euro area and core inflation well below target, Simon Wren-Lewis argues that German fiscal policy, in particular, is too tight, calling for stimulus in the form of public investment.

  • Thorsten Beck, 01 June 2018

    The recent eBook, "Ordoliberalism: A German oddity?", was presented in Washington DC and Vienna. This post summarises the discussion concerning the divergence between practice in theory when it comes to bank bailouts and ordoliberalism.

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