Blogs&Reviews

  • The effects of the ECB’s new inflation target on private households’ inflation expectations

    Mathias Hoffmann, Emanuel Moench, Lora Pavlova, Guido Schultefrankenfeld, 20 December 2021

    New survey results from the Bundesbank Online Panel Households (BOP-HH) show that the ECB's new inflation target is associated with moderately higher inflation expectations for the next two to three years. 

  • The ECB’s tools: Transparency is needed

    Lucrezia Reichlin, Klaus Adam, Warwick J. McKibbin, Michael McMahon, Ricardo Reis, Giovanni Ricco, Beatrice Weder di Mauro, 03 December 2021

    This blog replies to Rafael Repullo’s comment on CEPR's recent report on the ECB. The authors clarify that there is little to no disagreement. Most of what is in the comment coincides with what is in the report, using different words. Where disagreements exist, they reflect different views on the importance of transparency in communication of both strategy and future policy.

  • Rafael Repullo comments on some recommendations and statements on the tools of monetary policy at the ECB from the recent CEPR report on the central bank's strategy.

  • A primer on (UK) inflation

    David Blanchflower, 15 November 2021

    David Blanchflower explains why it is most likely the jump in inflation in the UK will dissipate

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Livio Stracca, 13 June 2018

    Knowledge of central banks is limited among households, who are also often found to have beliefs that are inconsistent with the foundations of the models underpinning modern monetary policy, such as the fact that higher interest rates lead to lower inflation. In this post, Livio Stracca describes the implications of this fact and summarises a new book that tries to popularise modern central banking for a wider audience.

  • Jeffrey Frankel, 12 June 2018

    Not long after having said that the China trade war was “on hold”, the Trump administration flipped the switch back to “on”. In this post, Jeffrey Frankel analyses Trump’s actions and asks whether his approach to trade can be explained.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 12 June 2018

    In the wake of the ‘Windrush generation’ row, Simon Wren-Lewis argues that the 2010 UK coalition government’s focus on immigration with the ‘tens of thousands’ target was a deceit because most of the government had no intention of achieving that target. Part of the facade of trying to hit that target was the hostile environment policy.

  • Nikolaus Wolf, 11 June 2018

    With protectionism back on the political agenda, the European Review of Economic History has published a selection of papers demonstrating how trade and welfare policies have always been related. As Nikolaus Wolf discusses in this post, the papers also show that while the wider economic benefits from protectionism are uncertain at best, 100 years ago domestic policy considerations were already often trumping international cooperation.

  • Jonathan Portes, 09 June 2018

    There are discrepancies between population and migrations statistics for the UK, for both EU and non-EU nationals. As Jonathan Portes outlines in this post, it seems reasonably clear that in the recent past EU migration has been significantly higher, and non-EU migration significantly lower, than previously thought, and that, perhaps as a consequence of the government’s determination to reduce non-EU migration, the UK may have become even more dependent on EU migration.  

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