Blogs&Reviews

  • Rebellion, Rascals, and Revenue: A review

    Shafik Hebous, 07 April 2021

    Shafik Hebous admires how Michael Keen and Joel Slemrod draw out common threads of tax principles and practice that have underlain tax systems for thousands of years to show us why polices were chosen, and why they failed or prevailed.

  • Democracy in Iceland

    Thorvaldur Gylfason, 31 March 2021

    Thorvaldur Gylfason argues that unless Iceland's Parliament confronts the country's oligarchs and respects the will of the people by ratifying the new constitution designed to reverse the retreat of age-old democracy, it risks becoming a failed state.

  • Government spending: Less may be more!

    Roel Beetsma, Ludger Schuknecht, 25 March 2021

    Roel Beetsma and Ludger Schuknecht argue that governments could and should deliver more for their citizens’ money.

  • Twitter is free to ban users

    Jan Bouwens, 22 February 2021

    Jan Bouwens discusses the decision by Twitter and other social media platforms to ban President Trump and members of his campaign, and the objections to the bans raised by politicians.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Thorsten Beck, 01 June 2018

    The recent eBook, "Ordoliberalism: A German oddity?", was presented in Washington DC and Vienna. This post summarises the discussion concerning the divergence between practice in theory when it comes to bank bailouts and ordoliberalism.

  • Diane Coyle, 31 May 2018

    This review of Benn Steil’s new book on the Marshall Plan looks at the beginning of the Cold War from the vantage of post-Brexit Britain, and outlines how Steil sheds new insights on many of the players in the debate over the Marshall Plan’s adoption.

  • Jonathan Dingel, 31 May 2018

    Inferring tradability is hard. In this post, Jonathan Dingel reviews papers that explore predictions of tradable and non-tradable industries and activities.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 30 May 2018

    Macroeconomics gave up on trying to explain recent macroeconomic history, or, why the economy did what it did over the last 30 or 40 years. In this post, Simon Wren-Lewis argues that it is time that macroeconomics revisited the decisions it made around 1980, and realise that the deficiencies with traditional time series analysis were not as great as they were made out to be.

  • Jon Danielsson, 30 May 2018

    Volatility is only a good measure of risk when shocks are distributed normally. This post argues that extreme value theory offers a better, if imperfect alternative. Even better would be to use more fundamental analysis.  

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