Blogs&Reviews

  • Rebellion, Rascals, and Revenue: A review

    Shafik Hebous, 07 April 2021

    Shafik Hebous admires how Michael Keen and Joel Slemrod draw out common threads of tax principles and practice that have underlain tax systems for thousands of years to show us why polices were chosen, and why they failed or prevailed.

  • Democracy in Iceland

    Thorvaldur Gylfason, 31 March 2021

    Thorvaldur Gylfason argues that unless Iceland's Parliament confronts the country's oligarchs and respects the will of the people by ratifying the new constitution designed to reverse the retreat of age-old democracy, it risks becoming a failed state.

  • Government spending: Less may be more!

    Roel Beetsma, Ludger Schuknecht, 25 March 2021

    Roel Beetsma and Ludger Schuknecht argue that governments could and should deliver more for their citizens’ money.

  • Twitter is free to ban users

    Jan Bouwens, 22 February 2021

    Jan Bouwens discusses the decision by Twitter and other social media platforms to ban President Trump and members of his campaign, and the objections to the bans raised by politicians.

Other Recent Blogs&Reviews:

  • Thorsten Beck, 29 May 2018

    The main tension between London and Brussels seems to stem from a fundamentally different approach: for the UK government, Brexit is a political process; for the European Commission, a legal-administrative process. Thorsten Beck reviews the current situation and concludes that the political class in the UK has failed its population.

  • Roger Farmer, 29 May 2018

    So-called experts make predictions about prospects for UK after Brexit as if we can plan for the future using known statistical probabilities, but no one knows what the consequences will be relative to staying in the EU in 15 years’ time. The one thing that will get us into trouble, though, is being ‘sure’ about predictions that might be plain wrong.

  • Simon Wren-Lewis, 28 May 2018

    Voters for 'Leave' wanted a Brexit that delivered more money for public services, but that cannot be realised under any of the four possible Brexit scenarios on the table. Economics matters to voters, more so than issues of sovereignty or immigration, and this post argues that Leave voters were misled with mythical economic gains.

  • Jon Danielsson, 20 May 2018

    Two widely used indicators of financial risk, the VIX index and the ECB’s CISS, are at a historical low. As this post explains, however, provided we only worry about the immediate future, and then only care to measure the easily visible, our favourite risk indicators will tell us everything is fine even if the longer-term political uncertainty appears high.

  • Jeffrey Frankel, 19 May 2018

    President Trump and China are exchanging threats of raising tariffs which, if implemented, would signal the start of a trade war. There are some who defend Trump’s actions as bargaining tactics, but in this post I lay out seven reasons why China is unlikely to back down in this case, and why the US will not win this war.

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