Nicolas Ajzenman, Eleonora Bertoni, Gregory Elacqua, Luana Marotta, Carolina Méndez, 03 April 2021

Low-income students are more likely to attend schools with less-qualified teachers, expanding the very achievement gaps that public education should help reduce. Although the problem of teacher sorting is well-documented, policy responses have tended to focus on increasing compensation at hard-to-staff schools, which can be both expensive and ineffective. This column presents the results of a novel and low-cost strategy implemented nationwide by the government of Peru that successfully encouraged highly qualified teachers to apply for job openings in disadvantaged schools.

Alex Bryson, Lorenzo Corsini, Irene Martelli, 24 November 2020

Public spending on education in Italy has been falling for many years, limiting the hiring of new permanent teachers and thus raising the average age of teachers in the country. This column considers the effect of allocating permanent teacher contracts to older teachers on student performance in upper-secondary schools in Tuscany. The findings suggest that a higher proportion of older teachers in a school has a negative effect on student performance. The government may need to do more to recruit younger cohorts of teachers into permanent posts, preferably through periodic intakes.

Eduardo Levy Yeyati, Samuel Pienknagura, 10 June 2014

Latin America’s inequality has fallen, driven by a reduction in the educational wage premium. This column discusses potential driving forces behind this phenomenon and argues that while this is a positive outcome, it may reflect a deeper malaise. A preliminary evaluation suggests that supply changes are more important than de-industrialisation. But lacklustre PISA scores support a more dismal hypothesis. The premium decrease may mirror a decline in education quality.

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