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Research on risk premia, factors, and predictive regressions has traditionally focused on equity markets, while research on foreign exchange has been lagging despite its huge potential. Currently, the low yield environment, large international portfolio flows and unconventional monetary policy have made it crucial for asset managers to incorporate FX strategies and FX risk management. We therefore welcome papers on FX risk premia, FX strategies, FX valuation, FX and monetary policy, Emerging Market currencies, currency pegs, FX regimes, FX and business cycle, etc.

In addition to the above-mentioned research themes, we particularly encourage the submission of papers that deal with the interaction of FX and bond markets.

SUBMISSION OF PAPERS
Deadline for submission of papers is March 1, 2020.
Submission form: https://www.wu.ac.at/isk/conferences/submission

Giancarlo Corsetti, Romain Lafarguette, Arnaud Mehl, 13 August 2019

Many policymakers are concerned that fast trading has adverse effects on markets, although the existing evidence is ambiguous. This column argues that high-frequency trading can increase market efficiency and the quality of trade. By creating noise, fast trades may prevent traders with a herd mentality from pushing prices in one direction. 

Rawley Heimer, Alp Simsek, 03 August 2019

Policymakers for long have attempted to curb financial speculation while preserving markets for useful trading. This column analyses the impact of a recent US policy which restricts leverage in the foreign exchange market. It finds that the policy reduced speculative trading without impeding markets, and thus provides important lessons to address excessive growth in financial markets. 

Dagfinn Rime, Andreas Schrimpf, 23 December 2013

Trading in the FX market reached an all-time high of $5.3 trillion per day in April 2013 – a 35% increase relative to 2010. Smaller banks, institutional investors, and hedge funds have grown to become the largest counterparty segment, surpassing the inter-dealer segment. Facilitated by prime brokerage arrangements, these financial customers have become more active market participants, contributing further to a concentration of volume in financial centres like London and New York. A new form of ‘hot potato’ trading has emerged where dealers no longer play an exclusive role.

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