Shuai Chen, Jan van Ours, 26 November 2017

A host of empirical studies have found that people in partnerships tend to be happier than those who are single. This column uses panel data from the Netherlands to explore whether there is a causal effect of partnership on subjective wellbeing. The results suggest that both opposite-sex and same-sex marital partnership improves wellbeing, and the benefits of marriage appear to outweigh those of cohabitation.

Cevat Giray Aksoy, Christopher S. Carpenter, Jefferson Frank, 03 January 2017

Previous studies on labour market discrimination based on sexual orientation have not revealed whether reported differences in earnings have been due to differences in the samples, populations, or outcomes, nor what the likely cause might be. Using a UK-wide dataset of sexual orientation and labour market earnings, this column shows that the overall difference in earnings for men who identify as gay is near zero irrespective of whether they are in a partnership or not, while women with a lesbian orientation have an earnings premium of about 5.5%. Specialisation explains earnings differences that depend on partnership status, though outside London there is some evidence of discrimination.

Eleonora Patacchini , Giuseppe Ragusa, Yves Zenou, 14 November 2012

Discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation is perceived as widespread in the EU. This column provides the evidence. Fake CVs, some explicitly gay, were sent to job ads in Rome and Milan. Gay men were found to have a 30% lower chance of being called back. And while beauty increased callback rates for women, being overtly lesbian had no effect.

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