Brian Kovak, Lindsay Oldenski, Nicholas Sly, 15 January 2018

The impact of offshoring on domestic employment is hotly debated as the US looks to renegotiate trade treaties, but the existing literature is conflicting in its conclusions. This column employs the variation in the timing of US treaties to infer the causal effect of tax treaty-induced changes in foreign affiliate employment on changes in US domestic employment. Employment declines at some firms are offset by expanded employment at others, yielding a modest positive net effect of offshoring on US employment, albeit with substantial employment dislocation and reallocation of workers.

Javier Cravino, Andrei Levchenko, 22 October 2016

Multinational production has become one of the most important means by which firms serve foreign markets. This column examines the role of multinational firms in aggregate business cycle transmission. The results suggest that the combined impact of all foreign multinationals is small but significant, accounting for about 10% of the productivity shocks in a typical country and leading to a somewhat more synchronised international business cycle.

Anna Gumpert, James Hines, Monika Schnitzer, 05 October 2016

Multinational firms may invest in tax havens to avoid taxation in non-haven countries, but other motives, such as business opportunities in these countries, may also drive such investment. This column uses data on German firms to investigate the motives for tax haven investment. Tax avoidance does appear to be a motive, particularly for manufacturing firms. Policies that raise the costs of reallocating profits maybe be effective in attenuating firms’ use of tax havens.

Farid Toubal, Julien Martin, Jörn Kleinert, 16 November 2013

A few large firms have disproportionate influence on economic fluctuations even in large countries. Such multinational firms are likely to transmit shocks across borders. This column argues that foreign affiliates drive the real business-cycle comovement between the region of location and the parent country. A few mechanisms explaining this link are presented.

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