Hans-Joachim Voth, 20 August 2021

In 1932, Hitler and his followers believed that marching through the streets in uniform would convince the German public to vote them into power. But did the flags, songs and stomping boots actually persuade people? Hans-Joachim Voth tells Tim Phillips how polling data (and the spread of a pandemic) reveal whether this type of propaganda actually worked.

Read more about the research behind this Vox Talk:

Caesmann, M, Caprettini, B, Voth, H and Yanagizawa-Drott, D. 2021. 'Going Viral: Propaganda, Persuasion and Polarization in 1932 Hamburg'. CEPR

Vincenzo Galasso, Tommaso Nannicini, 22 September 2013

The perceived tone of a product or political advertisement affects public response – even holding constant the content of the message. This column provides evidence that men and women react differently to positive and negative tones in electoral advertisements. Negative advertising increases voter turnout among men but not women; positive advertising tends to win women’s sympathy but alienates men. This should inform gender-specific tailoring of targeted advertisements.

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CEPR Policy Research