Manuel Funke, Moritz Schularick, Christoph Trebesch, 21 November 2015

Recent events in Europe provide ample evidence that the political aftershocks of financial crises can be severe. This column uses a new dataset that covers elections and crises in 20 advanced economies going back to 1870 to systematically study the political aftermath of financial crises. Far-right parties are the biggest beneficiaries of financial crises, while the fractionalisation of parliaments complicates post-crisis governance. These effects are not observed following normal recessions or severe non-financial macroeconomic shocks.

Nauro Campos, 23 July 2013

After decades of macroeconomic stability, structural reforms and declining inequality, mass political protests unexpectedly erupted in Brazil. This column reports new empirical evidence on protests in Brazil over the long-run to shed some light on recent events. It argues that they were driven by three main factors: corruption in public services delivery, political ineptitude in the run-off to major international events, and the political-economy effects of the electoral cycle.

Events

CEPR Policy Research