Steven Davis, Stephen Hansen, Cristhian Seminario-Amez, 27 October 2020

COVID-19 will likely restructure economic activity in a variety of ways, and lead to the growth of some firms and the decline of others. This column uses stock markets to examine these effects as share prices are tied to expectations about future earnings growth. On days with large pandemic-related market moves, there is enormous dispersion in firm-level returns. Using firms’ pre-pandemic regulatory filings, which describe sources of future earnings risk, it uncovers dozens of relevant risks associated with lower or higher returns, including direct exposure to social distancing and indirect effects arising from substitution effects and supply-chain linkages.

Reint Gropp, Steven Ongena, Jörg Rocholl, Vahid Saadi, 07 August 2020

Recessions are periods of low opportunity costs for time and resources, and hence can facilitate a productivity-enhancing reallocation of resources and improve productivity growth. However, recessions can also slow productivity growth by intensifying credit frictions, for instance, through the accumulation of legacy assets in the banking sector. This column investigates the interaction between these two channels in the recent banking crisis and shows that US regions with more restructuring of inefficient banks during the post-Global Crisis recession experienced higher productivity growth in the real sector in subsequent years.

Shigeru Fujita, Giuseppe Moscarini, Fabien Postel-Vinay, 15 May 2020

Current government policies addressing the COVID-19 crisis protect the hardest-hit workers and jobs. The world economy, however, is already experiencing needs for employment reallocation towards certain essential activities. This column proposes a policy framework to resolve the trade-off between protecting valuable match-specific capital and restoring the desired pace of healthy reallocation. The scheme leverages the distinct age profile of COVID-19 health risks, matching capital, and worker reallocation, by tailoring furlough subsidies, wage subsidies, and unemployment insurance to worker age.

Rüdiger Bachmann, Christian Bayer, Christian Merkl, Stefan Seth, Heiko Stüber, Felix Wellschmied, 01 November 2017

Many establishments both hire and lay off within a short time window, resulting in ‘churn’. This column uses a newly constructed dataset to show that the rate of churn in Germany is high and can be up to 40% greater in booms compared to recessions. Both establishments that are shrinking and those that are growing hire more and lay off more in booms than in recessions.

Allan Collard-Wexler, Jan De Loecker, 03 February 2013

This paper measures the impact of the minimill, a drastic new technology for producing steel. The authors find that the sharp increase in the industry's productivity is linked to this new technology, and operates through two distinct mechanisms. First, minimills displaced the older technology, called vertically integrated production, and this reallocation of output was responsible for a third of the increase in the industry's productivity. Second, increased competition, due to the expansion of minimills, drove a substantial reallocation process within the group of vertically integrated producers, driving a resurgence in their productivity, and consequently of the industry's productivity as a whole.

CEPR Policy Research