Sebastian Stöckl, Martin Rode, 30 November 2021

Financial markets have shown contradictory reactions to the formation of populist administrations. This column, part of the Vox debate on populism, examines whether there is any systematic reason behind the radically different outcomes, using data for 331 elections in 41 EU and OECD countries. The immediate uncertainty introduced into financial markets by an increase in populist vote shares varies according to the populist host ideology. Markets are mostly suspicious of left-wing populism but view the electoral success of right-wing populist parties as unequivocally favourable, possibly because of the tendency for the political and economic elite to collude.

Mirko Draca, 21 May 2019

Mirko Draca of the University of Warwick discusses the political polarisation that has emerged over the past few years.

Andrew Oswald, Nattavudh Powdthavee, 13 February 2014

Rich people typically lean right politically. Are they motivated by deeply moral views or self-interest? This column argues that money makes you right-wing. It shows that lottery winners in the UK are more likely to switch their allegiance from left to right.

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